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If I have an array like this:

var array = [1, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10];

And I have a value like this:

var value = 8;

I want to get this result:

var result = getClosestValues(array, value); // [5, 9]

What's the correct/preferred way to do this in javascript? It seems like this is probably a formal algorithm somewhere. Maybe like this:

var getClosestValues = function(array, value) {
    var low, high = 0, value;
    for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        if (low <= value && low < array[i])
            low = array[i];
        if (high == value && high < array[i])
            high = array[i];
    };
    return [low, high];
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
what if there is an 8 in the array.. should it return just it ? –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Dec 13 '10 at 16:56
    
Are you looking to get the 2 closest values or the closest values either side of value. For example, if value=6 should it return [4,5] or [5,9]? –  Jonathon Bolster Dec 13 '10 at 16:57
    
Is the array guaranteed to be sorted? –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 13 '10 at 17:00
    
yeah, if 8 is in the array, it should return 8, otherwise, the two surrounding values –  Lance Pollard Dec 13 '10 at 17:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted

If the array is sorted and large, use a binary chop to find the nearest elements:

var getClosestValues = function(a, x) {
    var lo = -1, hi = a.length;
    while (hi - lo > 1) {
        var mid = Math.round((lo + hi)/2);
        if (a[mid] <= x) {
            lo = mid;
        } else {
            hi = mid;
        }
    }
    if (a[lo] == x) hi = lo;
    return [a[lo], a[hi]];
}

Otherwise, just scan from one end to the other, keeping track of the nearest values above and below the target. For this algorithm, your version is broken, unfortunately. Here's another version:

var getClosestValues = function(a, x) {
    var lo, hi;
    for (var i = a.length; i--;) {
        if (a[i] <= x && (lo === undefined || lo < a[i])) lo = a[i];
        if (a[i] >= x && (hi === undefined || hi > a[i])) hi = a[i];
    };
    return [lo, hi];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, binary search is your friend here. –  Daniel Pryden Dec 13 '10 at 17:03
    
You'll need to define a threshold for nearness, where you know that an element X is lower than the target, and an element Y is larger than the target, and then scan between those two elements. That's entirely possible that you'll need to track those. So as you test an element it, before discarding, store it in one of those two holding places. –  jcolebrand Dec 13 '10 at 17:10
4  
This fails for me when array.length is an odd number. var mid = Math.round((lo + hi)/2); fixes it. –  miguelrios Mar 20 '12 at 0:46
1  
@miguelrios: Thank you for pointing that out. I forgot that division is always floating-point in JavaScript. I've amended my answer. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 20 '12 at 4:31
    
@GhoulFool: The linear-scan algorithm reports that 10.1 is the nearest value on-or-above 10 and that there's no value on-or-below it. What's wrong with that? Incidentally, I've just tweaked the binary-chop version so that it behaves the same way. It used to return the two lowest values, even though they were both higher than 10. –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 20 '13 at 2:21

For array with sorted values (data is a matrix, xIndex is the column to search, xVal is the value to sarch for, threshold is the tolerated distance (maybe 0) ):

public static int getNearestValueIndex(double[][] data, int xIndex, Number xVal, int threshold){
    int indexMin = 0;
    int indexMax=data.length-1;

    int index;
    double val;
    double valToFind=xVal.doubleValue();
    double diff;
    index = (indexMax+indexMin)/2;
    while(index!=indexMin){

        val = data[index][xIndex];
        diff = Math.abs(valToFind-val);
        if(diff<=threshold) break;

        if(val<valToFind){
            indexMin=index;
        }else if(val>xVal.doubleValue()){
            indexMax=index;
        }
        index = (indexMax+indexMin)/2;
    }
    val = data[index][xIndex];
    if(data.length>(index+1) && Math.abs(valToFind-val)> Math.abs(valToFind-data[index+1][xIndex])){
        index=index+1;
    }

    return index;
}
share|improve this answer

C-code

#include <stdio.h>

#define moddiff(a,b) ((a > b) ? (a-b) : (b-a))

#define uint unsigned int

/* test case : sample array */
uint arr[] = { 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49 , 64, 81 };

/* search for nearest num to key in a sorted array */
uint nrst_num(uint arr[], uint lo, uint hi, uint key) 
{
  uint mid = 0;
  uint mid_parent = 0;

  while (lo <= hi) {
    mid_parent = mid;
    mid = (lo + hi) / 2; 

    if (key == arr[mid]) {
        return mid;
    } else if (key < arr[mid]) {
        hi = mid - 1;
    } else if (key > arr[mid]) {
        lo = mid + 1;
    }   
  }

  uint ldiff = moddiff(key, arr[lo]);
  uint mdiff = moddiff(key, arr[mid]);
  uint hdiff = moddiff(key, arr[hi]);
  uint mid_parent_diff = moddiff(key, arr[mid_parent]);

  /* select the index from the lowest diff */
  if ((mid_parent_diff <= mdiff) && (mid_parent_diff <= ldiff) && (mid_parent_diff <= hdiff)) {
        return mid_parent;
  } else if ((mdiff <= mid_parent_diff) && (mdiff <= ldiff) && (mdiff <= hdiff)) {
        return mid;
  } else if ((ldiff <= mdiff) && (ldiff <= hdiff) && (ldiff <= mid_parent_diff)) {
        return lo;
  }

  return hi; 
}


int main()
{
 /* test case */
  uint key = 0;

  printf(" { 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49 , 64, 81 }");
  uint res = nrst_num(arr, 0, 8, key);

  printf (" nearest point to key=%d is val=%d \n", key, res); 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Providing c code for a javascript question is not that useful! –  Lee Taylor Jan 19 '13 at 3:54

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