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I have a class that defines a read-only property that effectively exposes a private field, something like this:

public class Container
{
    private List<int> _myList;

    public List<int> MyList
    {
    	get { return _myList;}
    }

    public Container() : base ()
    {
    	_myList = new List<int>();
    }

    // some method that need to access _myList
    public SomeMethod(int x)
    {
         _myList.Add(x);
    }
}

now it's impossible for the consumer to manage my property directly, so code like aContainer.MyList = new List(); generates a compile-time error. However, the consumer is absolutely free to call all sorts of methods on the reference he got, so this is perfectly valid code

Container c = new Container();  
Console.WriteLine(c.MyList.Count);  
c.MyList.Add(4);  
Console.WriteLine(c.MyList.Count);

which kind of defeats the whole read-only concept.

Is there any sane workaround that would enable me to have a real read-only reference propery?

P.S. I cannot just return a copy of the list because then the user will think that he made all the changes necessary, but alas... they will be gone.

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You forgot to write in your code that _myList is readonly. ;) –  Spoike Jan 14 '09 at 14:34
    
The field in itself is not read-only, it is accessed from other class methods, only the property is read-only. However, even declaring the field read-only did not help :( –  SWeko Jan 14 '09 at 14:38
    
It builds perfectly when I try it. if you have a readonly field, the field can be assigned once (either statically or in the constructor). –  Spoike Jan 14 '09 at 14:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reference is "readonly", the the actual object. I.e. you can't replace the reference with another object. So if you have a class that breaks it like this:

public class Container
{
    private readonly  List<int> _myList;

    public List<int> MyList
    {
        get { return _myList;}
    }

    public Container() : base ()
    {
        _myList = new List<int>();
    }

    public void BreakReadOnly()
    {
        _myList = new List<int>();
    }
}

…then it won't even compile. It's because a readonly field can't be reassigned with any other object. In this case BreakReadOnly will try to assign a new list.

If you really want a readonly collection of it then you can do it like this:

    public ReadOnlyCollection<int> MyList
    {
        get { return _myList.AsReadOnly(); }
    }

Hope this helps.

Updated: Removed use of IEnumerable.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no issue with class methods accessing the private field, I just want to keep the outside world from messing with it, so using readonly on the field would only hinder me (I added SomeMethod to the question) –  SWeko Jan 14 '09 at 14:50
    
The ReadOnly thing did the trick –  SWeko Jan 14 '09 at 14:55
    
Updated the text. But SWeko, do you want it to be readonly as in, you can't touch the innards by anyone at all even by the owning object/class that has it? Or just by the outside? –  Spoike Jan 14 '09 at 14:56
    
Ah great to hear that. –  Spoike Jan 14 '09 at 14:57
    
sorry, I meant _myList.AsReadOnly(); in the real world problem I cannot change the return type (IList<>) so now I get a run-time error on Add's and Remove's but that's more than enough compared with the silent fails I was getting before –  SWeko Jan 14 '09 at 15:00

Have a look at the static Array.AsReadOnly() method, which you can use to return a wrapper around an array that prevents it from being modified.

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Don't return a direct reference to your list. Instead return a ReadOnlyCollection wrapped around it, or if the List<> return type is set in stone, return a copy of your list. They can do whatever they want to the copy without affecting the original.

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You want _myList, which is a reference type to be readonly. Well, it is readonly and there is no defeat of the readonly concept.

The CLR implements a readonly property for reference types in such a way that the reference(pointer to the object if you want) is what is made readonly while the object to which the reference is pointing can be modified.

To work around this, you would need to make the member fields of the object themselves, readonly, because you cannot make the whole object readonly by attaching a readonly flag to the object's reference.

You can implement your on immutable generic collection class which would behave the same way as the List<> object but having readonly members.

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You could return a readonly Collection like this:

    public ReadOnlyCollection<int> MyList
    {
        get { return _myList.AsReadOnly(); }
    }

or return a new List so that the caller can change the list without changing the original list.

    public List<int> MyList
    {
        get { return new List<int>(_myList)}
    }
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