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I have a function that reads a file in chunks.

public static DataObject ReadNextFile(){ ...}

And dataobject looks like this:

public DataObject
{
   public string Category{
      get;set;
   }
}

What I want to do is the following basically

List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();

while(ReadNextFile().Category == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(^^^^^ the thingy in the while);
}

I know it's probably not how it's done, because how do I access the object I've just read.

share|improve this question
    
are you sure , what you want to ask? – TalentTuner Dec 13 '10 at 17:27
    
I having a hard time trying to figure out exactly what you want. – poindexter12 Dec 13 '10 at 17:28
    
I'm sorry I realize my question is very vague. It's just how do I access the object in the while(ReadNextElement()) :p – Timo Willemsen Dec 13 '10 at 17:30
    
Re the loop logic, is that really what you want to do? Wouldn't you rather read all the "matching" DataObjects from the file, whether there are others in between or not? – Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '10 at 18:07
    
@Timo: Just for the record: am I right in suggesting that your real DataObject contains more properties than just the category that you're testing for? – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 18:25
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think what you're looking for is:

List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();

DataObject nextObject;
while((nextObject = ReadNextFile()).Category == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(nextObject);
}

But I wouldn't do that. I'd write:

List<DataObject> dataObject = source.ReadItems()
                                    .TakeWhile(x => x.Category == "Category")
                                    .ToList();

where ReadItems() was a method returning an IEnumerable<DataObject>, reading and yielding one item at a time. You may well want to implement it with an iterator block (yield return etc).

This is assuming you really want to stop reading as soon as you find the first object which has a different category. If you actually want to include all the matching DataObjects, change TakeWhile to Where in the above LINQ query.

(EDIT: Saeed has since deleted his objections to the answer, but I guess I might as well leave the example up...)

EDIT: Proof that this will work, as Saeed doesn't seem to believe me:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class DataObject
{
    public string Category { get; set; }
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

class Test
{

    static int count = 0;

    static DataObject ReadNextFile()
    {
        count++;
        return new DataObject
        {
            Category = count <= 5 ? "yes" : "no",
            Id = count
        };
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();

        DataObject nextObject;
        while((nextObject = ReadNextFile()).Category == "yes")
        {
            dataObjects.Add(nextObject);
        }

        foreach (DataObject x in dataObjects)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", x.Id, x.Category);
        }
    }
}

Output:

1: yes
2: yes
3: yes
4: yes
5: yes

In other words, the list has retained references to the 5 distinct objects which have been returned from ReadNextFile.

share|improve this answer
    
Heya, this really seems like the best solution for this. There is however one thing, the file I'm reading from can be exceptionally big (few megabytes). Reading all items upfront, can that be a perfomance issue? – Timo Willemsen Dec 19 '10 at 13:58
List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();
string category = "";

while((category=ReadNextFile().Category) == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(new DataObject{Category = category});
}

And if you have more complicated object you can do this (like jon):

List<DataObject> dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();
var category = new DataObject();

while((category=ReadNextFile()).Category == "category")
{
   dataObjects.Add(category);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Omg it's so simple... – Timo Willemsen Dec 13 '10 at 17:31
1  
@Saeed: Sorry, my previous comment apparently didn't make it - I'm on a flaky 3G network connection. This won't compile, because you're trying to add a string to a List<DataObject>. The idea isn't to remember the last category, it's to remember the last DataObject. See my answer for the fixed version. – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 17:37
    
@Jon Skeet, I'd edited the answer, thanks, I didn't think about the type of list I just want to show the way OP wants. – Saeed Amiri Dec 13 '10 at 17:40
    
Now, Realy I can't understand the downvotes after my edit? – Saeed Amiri Dec 13 '10 at 17:41
    
@Saeed: Still -1, because while all we've been shown is the Category property, in real life I'd expect there to be more data in the object... which gets lost with your current code. As the OP says, he wants to remember the object he's just read, not reconstruct it from the one bit of information he's filtering on. It's not hard to do - look at my answer. – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 17:42

This is subjective, but I hate this pattern (and I fully recognize that I am in the very small minority here). Here is how I do it when I need something like this.

var dataObjects = new List<DataObject>();
while(true) {
    DataObject obj = ReadNextFile();
    if(obj.Category != "category") {
        break;
    }
    dataObjects.Add(obj);
}

But these days, it is better to say

List<DataObject> dataObjects = GetItemsFromFile(path)
                                   .TakeWhile(x => x.Category == "category")
                                   .ToList();

Here, of course, GetItemsFromFile reads the items from the file pointed to by path and returns an IEnumerable<DataObject>.

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter: Please explain. – jason Dec 13 '10 at 17:57
    
I downvoted you because it's out of the question. – Saeed Amiri Dec 13 '10 at 17:59
    
And Also I have 4 downvoter just one of them said why? and non of them remove it. – Saeed Amiri Dec 13 '10 at 18:00
1  
@Saeed: What do you mean "because it's out of the question?" This is strange behavior, to be sure. – jason Dec 13 '10 at 18:28
1  
@Saeed: Why is "LINQ not an answer?" What do you mean "the first one does not address the OPs signature" (sic). – jason Dec 13 '10 at 19:13

You should look into implementing IEnumerator on the class container the call to ReadNextFile(). Then you would always have reference to the current object with IEnumerator.Current, and MoveNext() will return the bool you are looking for to check for advancement. Something like this:

public class ObjectReader : IEnumerator<DataObject>
{
    public bool MoveNext()
    {
       // try to read next file, return false if you can't
       // if you can, set the Current to the returned DataObject
    }

    public DataObject Current
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to go to all the hassle of implementing it yourself - use iterator blocks instead. They rock :) – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 18:49
    
I agree you don't NEED to, but if that is the purpose of that object (which it looks like it is), it seems like it's a more elegant solution IMO. – poindexter12 Dec 13 '10 at 18:51
    
@poindexter12: Creating a whole type explicitly and then using it is more elegant than just writing a method using an iterator block? I suggest you try writing a complete solution both ways and then judge again... – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 19:22
    
@Jon: If you look at what he is asking, and don't try to add anything, yeah, an iterator is the smallest, quickest solution. Based on what he was asking though, it seemed like going through a list of objects and looking at what the current item exactly mirrors the purpose of the IEnumerator, hence the suggestion. – poindexter12 Dec 13 '10 at 19:32
    
@poindexter12: If you create an iterator block you can still use the generated IEnumerator<DataObject>. The calling code would be the same either way - the iterator block just saves you a lot of hassle. As I say, you should try implementing it both ways... – Jon Skeet Dec 13 '10 at 19:34

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