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trait Link[This] {
    var next:This = null
}

gives "type mismatch; found: Null(null) required: This"

So presumably I need to tell the type checker that This is going to be a type that can be assigned null. How do I do this?

(If there's a site I should be reading first before asking questions like this, please point me at it. I'm currently part-way through the preprint of the 2nd Ed of Programming In Scala)

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have to constrain This to be a superclass of Null - which is the way of telling the compiler that null is a valid value for that type. (In fact, thinking about Any, AnyRef and AnyVal only muddles the problem - just ask the compiler for what you want!)

trait Link[This >: Null] {
  var next:This = null
}

However, I would suggest that you avoid using null, you could use Option[This] and affect None - such a construction will allow you to use pattern matching, and is a very strong statement that clients using this field should expect it to maybe have no value.

trait Link[This] {
  var next:Option[This] = None
}
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Quite right about the Option and it will go that way eventually. But this is a step in refactoring some code originally in Java, and there's too many uses of null to do that right now –  Paul Dec 13 '10 at 18:13
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trait Link {
  var next:This = null
}

This should work. Is there a specific reason that you want to need to parameterize the trait with a type?

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Is there a specific reason why you assume that the Link class is only as complex as the snippet he has written? –  Jean Hominal Dec 13 '10 at 18:01
    
Yes, there is a reason - this is mixed in to another class and I'm constructing a linked list of that class. –  Paul Dec 13 '10 at 18:12
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My first thought, which didn't work. I'm not sure why.

trait Link[This <: AnyRef] { // Without the type bound, it's Any
    var next: This = null
}

When worse comes to worst, there's always casting:

trait Link[This <: AnyRef] {
    var next: This = null.asInstanceOf[This]
}

With the cast, you no longer need the type bound for this trait to compile, although you might want it there for other reasons.

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I believe that the reason is that "extends AnyRef" and "accepts null as a value" are logically distinct - one could see the fact that every currently possible type in the JVM either satisfies or denies both as an implementation detail. –  Jean Hominal Dec 13 '10 at 18:22
1  
It didn't work because there is the idea that some classes of AnyRef could be forced to be not null. So you need trait Link[This >: Null <: AnyRef]. But nothing in AnyVal is a superclass of Null anyway, so Link[This >: Null] is enough. –  Rex Kerr Dec 13 '10 at 18:23
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