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Can any one Explain me plz the concept of Growing Array Of Structs. i mean dynamic Arrays. thanks for your Time.

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closed as not a real question by Matt Ball, ruslik, Michael Burr, Jens Gustedt, Graviton Dec 15 '10 at 1:22

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What exactly do you need help with? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '10 at 18:00
9  
You need to make sure it gets plenty of sunlight and water it regularly –  Falmarri Dec 13 '10 at 18:01
    
I'm sure wiki explains it much better than someone here would care to. Why don't you read it and ask here a specific question? –  ruslik Dec 13 '10 at 18:02
    
Lookup Dynamic Array (like vector, ArrayList) on Wikipedia. That should get you started. –  Sanjit Saluja Dec 13 '10 at 18:06

5 Answers 5

Start with a small array of some size, then whenever you need to increase the size, use realloc to do so; it is common to double the size of the array whenever you resize it.

For example:

int length = 5;
my_struct *array = NULL;

/* Initialization */
array = (my_struct *)malloc(length * sizeof(my_struct));

/* Use array[0] .. array[length - 1] */

/* When you reach the limit, resize the array */
length *= 2;
array = (my_struct *)realloc(array, length * sizeof(my_struct));
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+1 for complete answer, but is that realloc() portable? I mean, I tried that too, but sometimes I get an error and sometimes it works. Same conditions, same system, same data. –  BlackBear Dec 13 '10 at 18:25
    
@BlackBear: Yes, it's very much portable. What kind of error did you get? –  casablanca Dec 13 '10 at 18:30
    
Resource leak. A sort of. I don't have that source anymore. –  BlackBear Dec 13 '10 at 18:34
    
@BlackBear: if you didn't allocate memory for your structs' members, then you really should have any resources left out when you free that pointer. –  haylem Dec 14 '10 at 0:27
    
In this code, if realloc can't allocate enough memory, you have a memory leak. I think take into a temporary variable and check it before assigning to array. –  Appu Dec 14 '10 at 4:29

Do you mean dynamic size of an array? In that case you must allocate memory fitting for you needs. See realloc

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I have a dynamically growing string buffer implementation. You can get it from here. It uses the same malloc and realloc technique.

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Look at realloc function from the standard library.

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Look up malloc?

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