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according to the latest article by Dave Thomas in the pragpub magazine http://pragprog.com/magazines Ruby 1.9 should accept multiple splat arguments in array literals, eg:

[ *'2'..'10', *%w{ J Q K A } ]

But on my machine I am getting a parsing failure. Under 1.9.1p378, i am only getting the last array literal returned and under 1.9.2p0 I am getting a parse error reading the comma between literals.

ruby-1.9.1-p378 :001 > [ *'2'..'10', *%w{ J Q K A } ]
 => ["J", "Q", "K", "A"] 


ruby-1.9.2-p0 > [ *'2'..'10', *%w{ J Q K A } ]
SyntaxError: compile error
(irb):13: syntax error, unexpected ',', expecting ']'

update: my ruby settings:

  ruby:
    interpreter:  "ruby"
    version:      "1.9.2p0"
    date:         "2010-08-18"
    platform:     "x86_64-darwin10.4.0"
    patchlevel:   "2010-08-18 revision 29036"
    full_version: "ruby 1.9.2p0 (2010-08-18 revision 29036) [x86_64-darwin10.4.0]"

I'm curious if anyone else is getting this syntax to work?

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Can you splat a Range like that, without converting it to an Array? edit: turns out you can, even in 1.8. Damn cool! –  Alex Wayne Dec 13 '10 at 18:30
1  
WorksForMePerfectly with 1.9.2p0 (Win 7 x64) –  Ernest Dec 13 '10 at 18:30
    
Also worked fine in 1.9.1p243 –  Phrogz Dec 13 '10 at 19:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I fetched head for 1.9.2 and recompiled, below are my settings:

  ruby:
    interpreter:  "ruby"
    version:      "1.9.2p94"
    date:         "2010-12-08"
    platform:     "x86_64-darwin10.5.0"
    patchlevel:   "2010-12-08 revision 30140"
    full_version: "ruby 1.9.2p94 (2010-12-08 revision 30140) [x86_64-darwin10.5.0]"

so apparently it was fixed by the time @Beerlington compiled and seems fixed on ruby edge.

ruby-1.9.2-head :001 > [ *'2'..'10', *%w{ J Q K A } ]
 => ["2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "J", "Q", "K", "A"] 
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1  
1.9.2 is intended to replace all installations of 1.9.1, as it's the first "production ready" version. –  tadman Dec 13 '10 at 20:21
    
yah, the weird thing is that I was using 1.9.2p0 and it wasn't working, but I think that there must have been an incompatibility perhaps in the last os x upgrade which was fixed by recompiling ruby after the update. I dunno, its the best guess i can muster. –  Jed Schneider Dec 14 '10 at 1:43
    
If you installed 1.9.2-p0, then installed Snow Leopard, you'd have to recompile Ruby. Leopard was 32-bit and Snow Leopard is 64-bit. You'll also need to recompile all your gems with native code as they will now be upset. I think gem pristine --all will do it. –  the Tin Man Dec 14 '10 at 5:30
    
@greg, no it was compiled under snow leopard (note the ruby version above indicates x86-64) but before the latest snow leopard 10.5.6 upgrade. –  Jed Schneider Dec 14 '10 at 14:25
    
hmmm. I didn't have to do any recompilation after the last update. Now you've got me wondering if I should. :-) Naw, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." :-) –  the Tin Man Dec 15 '10 at 23:42

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