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Just beginning with python and know enough to know I know nothing. I would like to find alternative ways of splitting a list into a list of dicts. Example list:

data = ['**adjective:**', 'nice', 'kind', 'fine',
        '**noun:**', 'benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal', 
        '**adverb:**', 'well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay'] 

I would be able to get:

[{'**adjective**': ('nice', 'kind', 'fine'),
 '**noun**': ('benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal'),
 '**adverb**': ('well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay')}] 
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It's not possible to get a list/dict structure like that second one you posted. It would have to be more like this: {'adjective': ['nice', 'kind', 'fine'], 'noun': ['benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal'], 'adverb': 'well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay']} –  Håvard Dec 13 '10 at 18:23
    
Lists are what most languages call arrays, what PHP calls arrays is arrays and dict combined. There's no such thins as {key1: val1, val2, val3} in Python. –  delnan Dec 13 '10 at 18:23
    
Your output isn't quite valid. Would you like {'adjective': ['nice', 'kind'], 'noun': ['benefit', profit',...]} ? –  kevpie Dec 13 '10 at 18:24

5 Answers 5

This might be as close at it gets to what you have asked:

d = collections.defaultdict(list)
for s in data:
    if s.endswith(":"):
        key = s[:-1]
    else:
        d[key].append(s)
print d
# defaultdict(<type 'list'>, 
#     {'adjective': ['nice', 'kind', 'fine'], 
#      'noun': ['benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal'], 
#      'adverb': ['well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay']})

Edit: Just for fun an alternative two-liner inspired by the answer by SilentGhost:

g = (list(v) for k, v in itertools.groupby(data, lambda x: x.endswith(':')))
d = dict((k[-1].rstrip(":"), v) for k, v in itertools.izip(g, g))
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>>> data = ['adjective:', 'nice', 'kind', 'fine', 'noun:', 'benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal', 'adverb:', 'well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay']
>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> dic = {}
>>> for i, j in groupby(data, key=lambda x: x.endswith(':')):
    if i:
        key = next(j).rstrip(':')
        continue
    dic[key] = list(j)

>>> dic
{'adjective': ['nice', 'kind', 'fine'], 'noun': ['benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal'], 'adverb': ['well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay']}
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+1 for the groupby –  Lennart Regebro Dec 13 '10 at 18:30
    
+1 yup. @SilentGhost, key = next(j).rstrip(':') ? –  kevpie Dec 13 '10 at 18:35
    
yups ... should'nt it be rstrip.... –  user506710 Dec 13 '10 at 18:38
    
I think it should be rstrip() instead of lstrip(), right? And this will yield strange results if two keys with no values in between are in the input list, but the requirements are actually not clear enough. –  Sven Marnach Dec 13 '10 at 18:38
    
@kevpie, @user, @Sven: thanks, fixed. left-right, I actually had to make a choice and made a wrong one. –  SilentGhost Dec 13 '10 at 18:42

The code below will give you a dictionary with one entry for each word with a colon after it.

data = ['adjective:', 'nice', 'kind', 'fine', 'noun:', 'benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal', 'adverb:', 'well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay']
result = {}
key = None
for item in data:
 if item.endswith(":"):
  key = item[:-1]
  result[key] = []
  continue
 result[key].append(item)
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And if there were keys without elements of a list after them ? , I thought. So I added 'nada:' in front, 'nothing:' in the middle, and ’oops:’ at the end of the list named data.

Then, in these conditions, the code 1 (in following) with groupy appears to give a completely false result, the code 2 with defaultdict give a result in which keys 'nada:' , 'nothing:' , and ’oops:’ are absent. They are also less fast than the simplest solution (code 3: Cameron, user506710)

I had an idea => codes 4 and 5. Results are OK and executions are faster.

from time import clock

data = ['nada:',    # <<<=============
    'adjective:',
    'nice', 'kind', 'fine',
    'noun:',
    'benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal',
    'nothing:', # <<<=============
    'adverb:',
    'well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay',
    'oops:'     # <<<=============
    ]

#------------------------------------------------------------
from itertools import groupby

te = clock()
dic1 = {}
for i, j in groupby(data, key=lambda x: x.endswith(':')):
    if i:
        key = next(j).rstrip(':')
        continue
    dic1[key] = list(j)
print clock()-te,'    groupby'
print dic1,'\n'

#------------------------------------------------------------
from collections import defaultdict
te = clock()
dic2 = defaultdict(list)
for s in data:
    if s.endswith(":"):
        key = s[:-1]
    else:
        dic2[key].append(s)
print clock()-te,'   defaultdict'
print dic2,'\n\n==================='

#=============================================================
te = clock()
dic4 = {}
for x in data:
    if x[-1] == ':' :
        start = x.rstrip(':')
        dic4[start] = []
    else:
    dic4[start].append(x)
print clock() - te
print dic4,'\n'

#------------------------------------------------------------
te = clock()
dic3 = {}
der = len(data)
for i,y in enumerate(data[::-1]):
    if y[-1]==':':
        dic3[y[0:-1]] = data[len(data)-i:der]
        der = len(data)-i-1
print clock()-te
print dic3,'\n'

    #------------------------------------------------------------
te = clock()
dic5 = {}
der = len(data)
for i in xrange(der-1,-1,-1):
    if data[i][-1]==':':
        dic5[data[i][0:-1]] = data[i+1:der]
        der = i
print clock() - te
print dic5

print '\ndic3==dic4==dic5 is',dic3==dic4==dic5
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If you assume inner to be the list of words you could have this as the code

data = ['adjective:', 'nice', 'kind', 'fine', 'noun:', 'benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal', 'adverb:', 'well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay']

dict = {}

for x in data:

    if x[-1] == ':' :

       start = x.rstrip(':')

       dict[start] = []

    else:

       dict[start].append(x)

print dict

This prints the following dictionary

{'adjective': ['nice', 'kind', 'fine'], 'noun': ['benefit', 'profit', 'advantage', 'avail', 'welfare', 'use', 'weal'], 'adverb': ['well', 'nicely', 'fine', 'right', 'okay']}
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