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What does the % in a calculation? I can't seem to work out what it does.

Does it work out a percent of the calculation for example: 3 + 2 + 1 - 5 + 4 % 2 - 1 / 4 + 6 is apparently equal to 7. How?

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What tutorial are you using where this wasn't made clear? –  S.Lott Dec 13 '10 at 19:18
2  
@S.Lott - has anyone ever answered that question? –  Russell Borogove Dec 13 '10 at 19:30
    
@Russell Borogove: A few. Mostly they're using the standard Tutorial on the Python.org site. I suspect some people aren't using a tutorial at all and are simply typing random code. But I can't be sure until I get some answers. And I can't get answers unless I ask. Right? –  S.Lott Dec 13 '10 at 20:23
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It's LPTHW..... –  orange Apr 17 '11 at 13:31

13 Answers 13

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The % (modulo) operator yields the remainder from the division of the first argument by the second. The numeric arguments are first converted to a common type. A zero right argument raises the ZeroDivisionError exception. The arguments may be floating point numbers, e.g., 3.14%0.7 equals 0.34 (since 3.14 equals 4*0.7 + 0.34.) The modulo operator always yields a result with the same sign as its second operand (or zero); the absolute value of the result is strictly smaller than the absolute value of the second operand [2].

Taken from http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html

Example 1: 6%2 evaluates to 0 because there's no remainder if 6 is divided by 2 ( 3 times ).

Example 2: 7%2 evaluates to 1 because there's a remainder of 1 when 7 is divided by 2 ( 3 times ).

So to summarise that, it returns the remainder of a division operation, or 0 if there is no remainder. So 6%2 means find the remainder of 6 divided by 2.

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Somewhat off topic, the % is also used in string formatting operations like %= to substitute values into a string:

>>> x = 'abc_%(key)s_'
>>> x %= {'key':'value'}
>>> x 
'abc_value_'

Again, off topic, but it seems to be a little documented feature which took me awhile to track down, and I thought it was related to Pythons modulo calculation for which this SO page ranks highly.

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2  
Thank you. This is a poorly documented and widely used feature and is what led me to this post. –  bedeabc Dec 29 '13 at 21:28
    
We love this off-topic answer. –  Jin-zhe Wang Jul 28 at 11:50
    
Is there logic to % also being used as string formatting reference or is it just an accident of history that that symbol was overloaded? Should this be its own question? –  WAF Aug 19 at 14:17

An expression like 'x % y' evaluates to the remainder of 'x / y'. Precedence rules are like '/' and '*'.

>>> 9 / 2
4
>>> 9 % 2
1
  • 9 divided by 2 is equal to 4.
  • 4 times 2 is 8
  • 9 minus 8 is 1 - the remainder.

Python gotcha: depending on the Python version you are using, % is also the (deprecated) string interpolation operator, so watch out if you are coming from a language with automatic type casting (like PHP or JS) where an expression like '12' % 2 + 3 is legal: in Python it will result in TypeError: not all arguments converted during string formatting which probably will be pretty confusing for you.

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Can you please explain using an example. Sorry. :( –  orange Dec 13 '10 at 18:34

Python - Basic Operators
http://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/python_basic_operators.htm

Modulus - Divides left hand operand by right hand operand and returns remainder

a = 10 and b = 20

b % a = 0

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In most languages % is used for modulus. Python is no exception.

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1  
As far as I can see, Python is unusual in that it uses % for modulus; Fortran, C/C++, and Java use % to mean remainder. (See stackoverflow.com/questions/13683563/… , the differences are in how negative and fractional values are handled.) The languages that make a distinction (e.g. Ada, Haskell, and Scheme) use the words "rem" and "mod" (or "remainder" and "modulo") rather than %. –  Jim Pivarski May 23 at 5:49
    
Update: I found this great table of modulo/remainder operations by language en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation . Python is unusual but not unique (for instance, TCL and Lua share Python's convention.) –  Jim Pivarski May 23 at 6:00

The modulus is a mathematical operation, sometimes described as "clock arithmetic." I find that describing it as simply a remainder is misleading and confusing because it masks the real reason it is used so much in computer science. It really is used to wrap around cycles.

Think of a clock: Suppose you look at a clock in "military" time, where the range of times goes from 0:00 - 23.59. Now if you wanted something to happen every day at midnight, you would want the current time mod 24 to be zero:

if (hour % 24 == 0):

You can thank of all hours in history wrapping around a circle of 24 hours over and over and the current hour of the day is that infinitely long number mod 24. It is a much more profound concept than just a remainder, it is a mathematical way to deal with cycles and it is very important in computer science. It is also used to wrap around arrays, allowing you to increase the index and use the modulus to wrap back to the beginning after you reach the end of the array.

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Modulus operator, it is used for remainder division on integers, typically, but in Python can be used for floating point numbers.

http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html

The % (modulo) operator yields the remainder from the division of the first argument by the second. The numeric arguments are first converted to a common type. A zero right argument raises the ZeroDivisionError exception. The arguments may be floating point numbers, e.g., 3.14%0.7 equals 0.34 (since 3.14 equals 4*0.7 + 0.34.) The modulo operator always yields a result with the same sign as its second operand (or zero); the absolute value of the result is strictly smaller than the absolute value of the second operand [2].

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It's a modulo operation, except when it's an old-fashioned C-style string formatting operator, not a modulo operation. See here for details. You'll see a lot of this in existing code.

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Also, there is a useful built-in function called divmod:

divmod(a, b)

Take two (non complex) numbers as arguments and return a pair of numbers consisting of their quotient and remainder when using long division.

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It is, as in many C-like languages, the remainder or modulo operation. See the documentation for numeric types — int, float, long, complex.

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The % (modulo) operator yields the remainder from the division of the first argument by the second. The numeric arguments are first converted to a common type.

3 + 2 + 1 - 5 + 4 % 2 - 1 / 4 + 6 = 7

This is based on operator precedence.

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% is modulo. 3 % 2 = 1, 4 % 2 = 0

/ is (an integer in this case) division, so:

3 + 2 + 1 - 5 + 4 % 2 - 1 / 4 + 6
1 + 4%2 - 1/4 + 6
1 + 0 - 0 + 6
7
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It's a modulo operation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation

http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html

So with order of operations, that works out to

(3+2+1-5) + (4%2) - (1/4) + 6

(1) + (0) - (0) + 6

7

The 1/4=0 because we're doing integer math here.

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