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I'm new JavaScript and trying to find out an easier way to find name given a value from object literal.

e.g.

var cars ={ Toyata: ['Camry','Prius','Highlander'],
            Honda:  ['Accord', 'Civic', 'Pilot'],
            Nissan: ['Altima', 'Sentra', 'Quest']};

Given 'Accord', I want to get Honda from the object Cars.

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What if another manufacturer has the same model? Let's say Chevrolet makes an Accord. –  meder Dec 13 '10 at 18:50
1  
"an easier way" than what? Why don't you post how you're doing it now? By the way, there is probably no easier way, unless you can use a library that might assist. –  George Jempty Dec 13 '10 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You would need to loop through, like this:

function getManufacturer(carName) {
    for(var key in cars) {
        if(cars.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
           for(var i=0; i<cars[key].length; i++) {
              if(cars[key][i] == carName) return key;
           }
        }
    }
    return "Not found";
}

You can test it out here, for the same of working cross-browser, this ignores the existence of .indexOf() since IE doesn't have it...that version would look like this:

function getManufacturer(carName) {
    for(var key in cars) {
        if(cars.hasOwnProperty(key) && cars[key].indexOf(carName) != -1) {
            return key;
        }
    }
    return "Not found";
}
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Just curious... is the cars.hasOwnProperty redundant? –  NG. Dec 13 '10 at 19:05
    
@SB - nope, not if someone messed with the Object prototype...better to be safe IMO –  Nick Craver Dec 13 '10 at 19:12
    
@SB: At this point it is mostly cargo cult programming. The theory is that it is safe to do it but not necessarily safe not to do it. See the footnote to my answer for possible reasons why it may not be safe to do it. Hint: hasOwnProperty will tell you if the property is inherited or not. –  slebetman Dec 13 '10 at 19:13
    
@slebetman - you don't have to inherit from anything out of the ordinary, not matter what you inherit from Object, and it can have additional properties added to its prototype. What if someone added a property that's a function, or a string, or...? Without it you're assuming everything there is an array that isn't a safe assumption. –  Nick Craver Dec 13 '10 at 19:16
    
@Nick: I mention what happens to that in my footnote: you have to do a hasOwnProperty check and I feel sorry for you. My assumption is that it is a raw javascript object not inheriting for anything. If it is an array then it is not a raw javascript object but inherits for Array instead so you'd have to do a hasOwnProperty check (again mentioned in my answer). –  slebetman Dec 13 '10 at 19:24

If you're going to be doing this once, then use a function like the one given by Bobby. If you're going to be doing this multiple times then I'd suggest creating a reverse mapping of cars to manufacturers:

var manufacturers = {};

// create a map of car models to manufacturers:
for (var manf in cars) {
    /* see note below */

    for (var i=0; i<cars[manf].length; i++) {
        manufacturers[cars[manf][i]] = manf;
    }
}

// Now referencing the manufacturers is 
// a very fast hash table lookup away:

var model = 'Accord';
alert(manufacturers[model]);

note for those with itchy downvoting fingers: For objects that don't inherit anything as given in the OP a hasOwnProperty check here is unnecessary. For objects that do inherit it depends on the programmer. If you want composability via inheritance then a hasOwnProperty check is exactly what you DONT want. If you don't care about inheritance then use a hasOwnProperty check but if so you would not be inheriting in the first place which would make a hasOwnProperty check unnecessary. In the rare case where you are forced to create the object via inheritance but don't want to check the parent's attributes then you should do a hasOwnProperty check. Of course, if you use a library like Prototype.js that insists on modifying the Object object then I feel sorry for you because you are forced to do a hasOwnProperty check.

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This wouldn't have the same result, it should be noted that if 2 manufacturers made the same car, this would return the last one, rather than the first, both positions being relative to object property order...which isn't guaranteed. –  Nick Craver Dec 13 '10 at 19:01
    
@Nick: Ah, but if we are talking about cars here then it is highly likely that the model names would be unique. Similarly, other problem domains may also have this property. Besides, object property have random order (at least in theory) so talking about "first" or "last" makes no sense if you don't first sort the manufacturer name. (tested it, on firefox at least object property does not necessarily come up in creation order when doing a for..in loop, this is not PHP) –  slebetman Dec 13 '10 at 19:10

Maintain a separate mapping of models to manufacturers.

var cars ={ Toyata: ['Camry','Prius','Highlander'],
            Honda:  ['Accord', 'Civic', 'Pilot'],
            Nissan: ['Altima', 'Sentra', 'Quest']};

var models = {};
var hasOwnProperty = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty;
for (key in cars) {
    if (hasOwnProperty.call(cars, key)) {
        var i=0,l=cars[key].length,manufacturer=cars[key];
        while (i<l) {
            if ( ! hasOwnProperty.call(models, manufacturer)) {
                models[manufacturer] = key;
            } else {
                // Throw an error, or change the value to an array of values
            }
            i++;
        }
    }
}
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More code: Yay! Hope about one data structure enabling bi-directional (bidi) mapping of keys to values, and vice versa –  George Jempty Dec 13 '10 at 21:41
    
@George -- forgive me for not understanding ... why do you suggest the data structure approach? I fail to see how that would be better in this case. (I'm guessing that it's for re-usability). –  Sean Vieira Dec 13 '10 at 22:00
    
Yes, for re-usability. Maybe a custom object that encapsulates the original data structure and the one you propose. But certainly some way of associating the two so they aren't in the global scope with no relationship to one another. –  George Jempty Dec 14 '10 at 1:30

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