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Version #1

use warnings;
use strict;

my $count = 4;

for $count (1..8) {
    print "Count = $count\n";
    last if ($count == 6);
}

if (not defined($count)) {
    print "Count not defined\n";
}
else {
    print "Count = $count\n";
}

This prints:

1
2
3
4
5
6
4

Why? Because the for loop creates its own lexically scoped version of $count inside its block.

Version #2

use warnings;
use strict;

my $count;
for $count (1..8) {
    print "Count = $count\n";
    last if ($count == 6);
}

if (not defined($count)) {
    print "Count not defined\n";
}
else {
    print "Count = $count\n";
}

1
2
3
4
5
6
Count not defined

Whoops! I wanted to capture the exit value of $count, but the for loop had it's own lexically scoped version of $count!. I just had someone spend two hours trying to track down this bug.

Version #3

use warnings;
use strict;

for $count (1..8) {
    print "Count = $count\n";
    last if ($count == 6);
}

print "That's all folks!\n";

This gives me the error Global symbol "$count" requires explicit package name at line 5. But, I thought $count was automatically lexically scoped inside the for block. It seems like that only occurs when I've already declared a lexically scoped version of this variable elsewhere.

What was the reason for this behavior? Yes, I know about Conway's dictate that you should always use my for the for loop variable, but the question is why was the Perl interpretor designed this way.

share|improve this question
2  
Does Larry Wall use stackoverflow? If not, questions about why the language was designed a certain way are unlikely to get answered. –  Wooble Dec 13 '10 at 19:58
1  
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/2247963/… –  eugene y Dec 13 '10 at 20:15
    
@Wooble: no, Larry has publicly commented about many design decisions and it's not unlikely that someone else will be able to give his reasons. –  ysth Dec 14 '10 at 4:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In Perl, assignment to the variable in the loop is always localized to the loop, and the loop variable is always an alias to the looped over value (meaning you can change the original elements by modifying the loop variable). This is true both for package variables (our) and lexical variables (my).

This behavior is closest to that of Perl's dynamic scoping of package variables (with the local keyword), but is also special cased to work with lexical variables (either declared in the loop or before hand).

In no case though does the looped over value persist in the loop variable after the loop ends. For a loop scoped variable, this is fairly intuitive, but for variables with scope beyond the loop, the behavior is analogous to a value localized (with local) inside of a block scope created by the loop.

for our $val (1 .. 10) {...} 

is equivalent to:

our $val;
my @list = 1 .. 10;
my $i = 0;

while ($i < @list) {
   local *val = \$list[$i++];
   # loop body
}

In pure perl it is not possible to write the expanded lexical version, but if a module like Data::Alias is used:

my $val;
my @list = 1 .. 10;
my $i = 0;

while ($i < @list) {
   alias $val = $list[$i++];
   # loop body
}
share|improve this answer

Actually, in version #3 the variable is "localized" as opposed to lexically scoped.

The "foreach" loop iterates over a normal list value and sets the variable VAR to be each element of the list in turn. If the variable is preceded with the keyword "my", then it is lexically scoped, and is therefore visible only within the loop. Otherwise, the variable is implicitly local to the loop and regains its former value upon exiting the loop. If the variable was previously declared with "my", it uses that variable instead of the global one, but it's still localized to the loop. This implicit localisation occurs only in a "foreach" loop.

In any case, you will not be able to access the loop variable from that stlye of for-loop outside the loop. But you could use the other style (C-style) for-loop:

my $count;
for ($count=1; $count <= 8; $count++) {
    last if $count == 6;
}
...   # $count is now 6.
share|improve this answer
    
That seems to imply that this should print "1" "2" "3", but it doesn't: my $count = "hello"; sub printCount() { print $count . "\n"; } foreach $count (1..3) { printCount(); } –  tster Dec 13 '10 at 20:01
    
Also in version #1 and version #2 –  hobbs Dec 13 '10 at 20:01
    
Actually, in my comment if I change the my $count to our $count then I get the expected output. –  tster Dec 13 '10 at 20:04
    
Okay, I see Perl wants to make a locally scoped variable, but if I declared a lexically scoped variable, Perl will use the variable in that context. –  David W. Dec 13 '10 at 22:23

Why? Because the for loop creates its own lexically scoped version of $count inside its block.

This is wrong. If you had written for my $count (...) { ... } it would be true, but you didn't. Instead, if $count is already a global, it's localized -- the global that already exists is set to new values during the execution of the loop, and set back when it's done. The difference should be clear from this:

our $x = "orig";

sub foo {
    print $x, "\n";
}

foo();

for $x (1 .. 3) {
  foo();
}

for my $x (1 .. 3) {
  foo();
}

The output is

orig
1
2
3
orig
orig
orig

The first for loop, without my, is changing the value of the global $x that already exists. The second for loop, with my, is creating a new lexical $x that isn't visible outside the loop. They're not the same.

This is also why example #3 fails -- since there isn't a lexical $count in scope and you haven't declared that you intend to touch the package global $count, strict 'vars' stops you in your tracks. It's not really behaving any differently for a for loop than anything else.

share|improve this answer
    
So "$count" wants to be "locally" scoped, but since I never declared a package variable w/ "our", and I had "use strict", it couldn't. However, if I had a lexically scoped version of "$count" it will create a lexically scoped version of that variable. –  David W. Dec 13 '10 at 22:26
    
No, hobbs, that's not true. If there is already a lexical $x in scope before the foreach, then a foreach $x (LIST) creates a brand new lexical $x for that loop. –  tchrist Dec 14 '10 at 1:00
    
True, but it doesn't in any of the cases that exist in David W.'s code :) –  hobbs Dec 14 '10 at 1:24

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