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I am using sql server 2008 rc2 and I have a question about naming conventions for scalar valued functions. Specifically the following code works fine

select from database.dbo.MyUDF('arg')

but when I get rid of the dbo and try:

select from database..MyUDF('arg')

I get a syntax error saying that this is ambiguous. I never use the dbo in the name of an object for tables, views, stored proc's or table valued functions and I never get this problem.

Why do I get this problem for a scalar udf?

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Because..... that's the way the team designed SQL Server.... sorry, there's really no clear reason - it's just that way, and it's always been that way, and no - you cannot change it - just get used to it and use it.... Actually, it is considered a best practice to always use the dbo. notation - so maybe it's time you start to use that, for all your objects. –  marc_s Dec 13 '10 at 19:56
1  
If you don't use dbo notation, then it means you're working with sysadmin rights. Otherwise you'd end up with [domain\user].Mytable for example on CREATE. Bad practice. At runtime, it attempts to resolve the user's schema before looking at dbo = slower performance. –  gbn Dec 13 '10 at 20:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First:

If you don't use dbo notation, then it means you're working with sysadmin rights. Otherwise you'd end up with [domain\user].Mytable for example on CREATE. Bad practice. At runtime, it attempts to resolve the user's schema before looking at dbo = slower performance.

Second:

Try using SYNONYMS

CREATE SYNONYM MyUDF FOR dbo.MyUDF

Note, Synonyms may require explicit permissions (but sounds like you're using sa or dbo anyway) and I've not used them with the database prefix so YMMV

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