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I'm not sure why this is never completing in IE7, but does in the other browsers. I've put an alert just after the if (i < l) and it fires once in IE7 but doesn't continue after that. Any clue?

// i, l, object, array, tr, table all determined up here.
function iterate(i, callback) {
    if (i < l) {
        tr = buildTableRow(object[array[i]]);
        tr.attr({
            "id": 'theObjectIs' + array[i]
        });
        table.append(tr);
        i = i + 1;
        iterate(i, callback);
    } else {
        callback();
    }
}

iterate(0, function() {
    alert("Draw Complete");
});
share|improve this question
    
You tested with an alert after if (i < l) {, but did you test it anywhere else? Perhaps just before iterate(i, callback);? Then if that one doesn't fire, keep moving it back until it does. And I'd suggest console.log() instead, especially when doing recursion. –  user113716 Dec 13 '10 at 20:31
    
Use IE8, run it in IE7 mode and set break points in the debugger. Step until it dies. –  epascarello Dec 13 '10 at 20:35
    
@patrick dw: As far as I know console isn't an option w/ IE7. –  A Wizard Did It Dec 13 '10 at 20:42
    
Ok, but how about the first half of my comment? –  user113716 Dec 13 '10 at 21:49
1  
Could it be a JavaScript error in buildTableRow that's causing the code to stop executing after the error occurs in that function? –  Andrew Whitaker Dec 13 '10 at 22:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sorry, can't see any reason for recursion here. Ordinary loop should work just fine:

for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    tr = buildTableRow(object[array[i]]);
    tr.attr({
        "id": 'theObjectIs' + array[i];
    });
    table.append(tr);
}
alert("Draw Complete");

For the record, you can check the value of l in your origianl code (alert?) most probably it's equal to 1 and that's why the function was executed only once.

Edit: the code can break with error in any line inside the loop/recursion thus explaining the problem. Detect such problem using such code:

if (i < l) {
    try {
        tr = buildTableRow(object[array[i]]);
        tr.attr({
            "id": 'theObjectIs' + array[i]
        });
        table.append(tr);
    } catch (ex) {
        alert("error occurred at index " + i);
    }
    i = i + 1;
    iterate(i, callback);
} else {
    callback();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Recursion and loops are perfectly interchangeably. It's a matter of style and performance. –  Dykam Dec 13 '10 at 22:11
    
@Dykam I was taught to believe recursion should be avoided if possible.. doesn't mean it's "god's command" but personally I think recursion is dangerous so why take a risk when you don't have to? –  Shadow Wizard Dec 13 '10 at 22:16
    
O_o run from wherever you learned that... Javascript is a good language for recursion, as it's quite functional. –  Dykam Dec 13 '10 at 22:37
    
@Dykam thanks I'll do some more research when I have time, guess it's up to the OP here to decide which is better in his case. :-) –  Shadow Wizard Dec 14 '10 at 6:40
    
@Dykam It's a matter of Stacksize, that's all. –  Ivo Wetzel Dec 14 '10 at 8:52

The performance of that recursion is going to be horrible by always updating the DOM with each iteration. If you want to be faster minimize the amount of repaints.

You want to be appending the the tbody and not the table element.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, should have probably elaborated or shown more code, the table is actually an element created but not in the DOM yet, I append it to the DOM where the alert is now. –  A Wizard Did It Dec 13 '10 at 20:43

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