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Hey guys I'm looking to run this query/calculated field in Access, heres what I want to do:

If(Salaries.Amount > 20000) { 
    If(Salaries.Amount > 30000) {
        If(Salaries.Amount > 40000) {
            Permits.Band = "Band 4";
        } Else {
            Permits.Band = "Band 3";
        }
    } Else {
        Permits.Band = "Band 2";
    }
} Else {
    Permits.Band = "Band 1";
}

Salaries and Permits are tables, with another 2 tables in the DB - Cars and Staff.

Salaries/Staff are linked by Staff_ID: 1 to 1,
Staff/Permits are linked by Staff_ID: 1 to 1,
Permits/Cars are linked by Permit_ID: 1 to M.

Basically the "Band" field in Permits needs to be calculated depending on the staff members salary... The salary has got to be in a separate table from the staff details, hence the Salaries table...

Any ideas?

EDIT:

In response to answer 1:

SELECT Switch(Salaries.Amount > 40000, "Band 4",
              Salaries.Amount > 30000, "Band 3",
              Salaries.Amount > 20000, "Band 2",
              True, "Band 1") AS Band
FROM (Staff INNER JOIN (Permits INNER JOIN Cars ON Permits.Perm_ID = Cars.Perm_ID) ON Staff.Staff_ID = Permits.Staff_ID) INNER JOIN Salaries ON Staff.Staff_ID = Salaries.Staff_ID;

Gives "Type mismatch in expression" when run...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

See Access' help topic for the Switch Function.

Switch(expr-1, value-1[, expr-2, value-2 … [, expr-n,value-n]])

"The expressions are evaluated from left to right, and the value associated with the first expression to evaluate to True is returned."

SELECT Switch(Salaries.Amount > 40000, "Band 4",
              Salaries.Amount > 30000, "Band 3",
              Salaries.Amount > 20000, "Band 2",
              True, "Band 1") AS band
FROM [your tables expression];

Update: I built and tested the Switch statement against a Salaries table where the Amount field is a numeric data type. Unless your Amount field is not numeric, I would check your FROM clause. Does this query run without error?

SELECT *
FROM (Staff INNER JOIN (Permits INNER JOIN Cars
    ON Permits.Perm_ID = Cars.Perm_ID) ON Staff.Staff_ID = Permits.Staff_ID)
    INNER JOIN Salaries ON Staff.Staff_ID = Salaries.Staff_ID;
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Thanks! Is that edit anything like what is needed? Thanks –  Chris Edwards Dec 13 '10 at 22:31
    
@Chris I don't know why you get "Type mismatch". See if my update yields a clue. –  HansUp Dec 14 '10 at 0:33
    
Same again when running that update... :( –  Chris Edwards Dec 14 '10 at 10:30
    
In that case, the problem is with the JOINs, not the Switch function. Get the JOINs working without error, then add the Switch expression. –  HansUp Dec 14 '10 at 14:55
    
Any time you're tempted to use SWITCH, you should perform a reality check, because basically the pairs of arguments in your Switch() statement should be stored in a TABLE. That is, by using Switch(), you're storing DATA in your SQL string, which is an obviously bad thing to do. –  David-W-Fenton Dec 19 '10 at 1:36

If you want something a little less hard-coded, you could put the bands in a new table (columns: id/name, lower, upper).

The lowest "lower" should be zero, each subsequent "lower" should be exactly equal to the previous "upper", and the last "upper" should be some huge number to stand in for infinity.

Then join something like this:

select whatever
from salaries s
inner join band b on b.lower <= s.amount and b.upper > s.amount

If salaries.amount can be null then you'll have to use a left outer join and handle that case specially.

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