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Here's my problem. I am calling a service that is returning several identical nodes which contain different values. I need to get the GUID values from these nodes and store them as a variable in my script to use later.

Example of the XML I write from the service:

<ShippingMethod>
    <Description>Description Goes Here</Description>
    <HandlingCharge>16.98</HandlingCharge>
    <ShippingMethodId>GUID</ShippingMethodId>
    <ShippingMethodName>Express Overnight</ShippingMethodName>
  </ShippingMethod>
<ShippingMethod>
    <Description>Description2 Goes Here</Description>
    <HandlingCharge>19.98</HandlingCharge>
    <ShippingMethodId>GUID2</ShippingMethodId>
    <ShippingMethodName>More Express Overnight</ShippingMethodName>
  </ShippingMethod>

I have several of these per request and they are dynamic. I don't want to chop this up using regex based on the values I currently have. That's hacky and will bite me later. The only thing I'm interested in at this point is reading this XML and pulling back all the values per request and putting them into an array which I can map in my code. My question is this, if you had this chunk of XML and you needed to get GUID and GUID2 to be stored as variables in a Ruby script what would you suggest using to parse it and do you have an example of reading it in and stripping the value?

ROXML, REXML, Nokogiri, Regex???

I appreciate your help!
~Regards Uninspired

share|improve this question
    
Don't use regex unless the XML is totally within your control and is simple. A parser like Nokogiri is very simple to use and is much more robust. Imagine what would happen if your XML changed from a pretty-print/indented format to everything on one line, and you were using regex. A parser wouldn't care. –  the Tin Man Dec 14 '10 at 0:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Definitely, use a XML parsing library! the only reason I could think of for doing it manually is to avoid a gem dependency. As for the library, that's very subjective, but I'd recommend Nokogiri: fast, concise and powerful.

require 'nokogiri'
doc = Nokogiri::XML.parse(xml_string)
doc.css("ShippingMethod ShippingMethodId").map(&:text) # ["GUID", "GUID2"]
share|improve this answer
    
This worked! Thanks!! –  r3nrut Dec 14 '10 at 16:17

I have used REXML for tasks like this successfully in the past. The following script will extract the GUID values:

require "rexml/document"

doc = REXML::Document.new File.open('doc.xml')
guids = doc.root.get_elements('//ShippingMethodId').map { |element| element.get_text }

assuming a file name 'doc.xml' or you can just pass in the XML string instead of a file. You will have to wrap the xml fragment in a single root element to make it well-formed XML before REXML will parse it:

<Root>
  <ShippingMethod>
    <Description>Description Goes Here</Description>
    <HandlingCharge>16.98</HandlingCharge>
    <ShippingMethodId>GUID</ShippingMethodId>
    <ShippingMethodName>Express Overnight</ShippingMethodName>
  </ShippingMethod>
  <ShippingMethod>
    <Description>Description2 Goes Here</Description>
    <HandlingCharge>19.98</HandlingCharge>
    <ShippingMethodId>GUID2</ShippingMethodId>
    <ShippingMethodName>More Express Overnight</ShippingMethodName>
  </ShippingMethod>
</Root>
share|improve this answer

Here's some ways I'd do it:

require 'nokogiri'

xml = '<xml><ShippingMethod>
    <Description>Description Goes Here</Description>
    <HandlingCharge>16.98</HandlingCharge>
    <ShippingMethodId>GUID</ShippingMethodId>
    <ShippingMethodName>Express Overnight</ShippingMethodName>
</ShippingMethod>
<ShippingMethod>
    <Description>Description2 Goes Here</Description>
    <HandlingCharge>19.98</HandlingCharge>
    <ShippingMethodId>GUID2</ShippingMethodId>
    <ShippingMethodName>More Express Overnight</ShippingMethodName>
</ShippingMethod></xml>
'
doc = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
doc.css('ShippingMethodId').inject([]){ |m,a| m << a.text } # => ["GUID", "GUID2"]
(doc / '//ShippingMethodId').map{ |n| n.text }              # => ["GUID", "GUID2"]
doc.search('//ShippingMethodId').map(&:text)                # => ["GUID", "GUID2"]
doc.search('//ShippingMethodId/text()').map{ |n| n.text }   # => ["GUID", "GUID2"]
doc.search('//ShippingMethodId/text()').map(&:to_s)         # => ["GUID", "GUID2"]
share|improve this answer
    
why do you use inject in the first example instead of map? –  tokland Dec 14 '10 at 8:02
    
It's just a different way of accomplishing it. Like they say, "There's more than one way to skin a cat." –  the Tin Man Dec 14 '10 at 8:05

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