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I am developing some linear algebra code that that is templated on the matrix coefficient type. One of the possible types is a class to do modular arithmetic, naively implemented as follows:

template<typename val_t> // `val_t` is an integer type
class Modular 
{
  val_t val_;
  static val_t modulus_;
public:
  Modular(const val_t& value) : val_(value) { };
  static void global_set_modulus(const val_t& modulus) { modulus_ = modulus; };

  Modular<val_t>& operator=(const Modular<val_t>& other) { val_ = other.val_; return *this; }

  Modular<val_t>& operator+=(const Modular<val_t>& other) { val_ += other.val_; val_ %= modulus_; return *this; }
  Modular<val_t>& operator-=(const Modular<val_t>& other) { val_ -= other.val_; val_ %= modulus_; return *this; }
  Modular<val_t>& operator*=(const Modular<val_t>& other) { val_ *= other.val_; val_ %= modulus_; return *this; }
  Modular<val_t>& operator/=(const Modular<val_t>& other) { val_ *= other.inverse().val_; val_ %= modulus_; return *this; }

  friend Modular<val_t> operator+(const Modular<val_t>& a, const Modular<val_t>& b) { return Modular<val_t>((a.val_ + b.val_) % Modular<val_t>::modulus_); };
  friend Modular<val_t> operator-(const Modular<val_t>& a, const Modular<val_t>& b) { return Modular<val_t>((a.val_ - b.val_) % Modular<val_t>::modulus_); };
  // ...etc.
};

However, when the program runs with the Modular<int> coefficients, it is several times slower than when it runs with int coefficients.

What are the things that I should change in the "Modular" class in order to gain maximum performance?

For instance, is it possible to optimize expressions like a*b + c*d to (a.val_*b.val_ + c.val_*d.val_) % modulus, and instead of the obvious:

(((a.val_*b.val_) % modulus) + ((c.val_*d.val_ % modulus) % modulus) % modulus)
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What programming environment is it being run in? Have you turned up the compiler optimization? –  wallyk Dec 13 '10 at 22:05
3  
You might want to perform reduction before multiplication, to prevent overflow. –  Ben Voigt Dec 13 '10 at 22:07
    
If modulus is a power of 2, you can use "x & (modulus-1)" instead of "x % modulus". Note that the results differ for negative x, though (-10 % 8 is -2, but -10 & (8-1) is 6) –  Tom Sirgedas Dec 13 '10 at 22:12
1  
@Tom Sirgedas: Any sane compiler will do this, if the modulus is known at compile-time. It's known as a "strength reduction", because it replaces a strong operator with a weaker one. –  Jørgen Fogh Dec 13 '10 at 22:13
    
@Jørgen Fogh: You are right. I was skeptical because of the different behavior with negative numbers, but the trick is to AND 80000007h and then OR with FFFFFFF8h for negatives (this requires a branch, though). –  Tom Sirgedas Dec 13 '10 at 22:20
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes. It is possible. What you want to look up is "expression templates" and start from there. From that point you're going to have to build some metaprogram logic to optimize/simplify the expression. Far from a trivial task, but that's not what you asked.

NVM - it's way trivial:

int count = 0;
int modulus() { count++; return 10; }

template < typename T >
struct modular
{
  modular(T v) : value_(v) {}

  T value() const { return value_; }
  void value(T v) { value_ = v; }

  typedef modular<T> modular_type;
  typedef T raw_type;
private:
  T value_;
};

template < typename LH, typename RH >
struct multiply
{
  multiply(LH l, RH r) : lh(l), rh(r) {}

  typedef typename LH::modular_type modular_type;
  typedef typename LH::raw_type raw_type;

  raw_type value() const { return lh.value() * rh.value(); }

  operator modular_type () const { return modular_type(value() % modulus()); }

private:
  LH lh; RH rh;
};

template < typename LH, typename RH >
struct add
{
  add(LH l, RH r) : lh(l), rh(r) {}

  typedef typename LH::modular_type modular_type;
  typedef typename LH::raw_type raw_type;

  raw_type value() const { return lh.value() + rh.value(); }
  operator modular_type () const { return modular_type(value() % modulus()); }

private:
  LH lh; RH rh;
};

template < typename LH, typename RH >
add<LH,RH> operator+(LH const& lh, RH const& rh)
{
  return add<LH,RH>(lh,rh);
}

template < typename LH, typename RH >
multiply<LH,RH> operator*(LH const& lh, RH const& rh)
{
  return multiply<LH,RH>(lh,rh);
}

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  modular<int> a = 5;
  modular<int> b = 7;
  modular<int> c = 3;
  modular<int> d = 8;

  std::cout << (5*7+3*8) % 10 << std::endl;

  modular<int> result = a * b + c * d;
  std::cout << result.value() << std::endl;

  std::cout << count << std::endl;

  std::cin.get();
}

If you were smart though, you'd put the use of % in the constructor for modular so it's always modular; you'd also put checks in to make sure LH and RH are compatible along with SFINAE crap to keep the operators from killing it for any time at all. You might also make modulus a template parameter and provide metafunctions to access it. At any rate...there you go.

Edit: BTW, you can use this same technique to make your matrices calculate faster. Instead of creating a new matrix for each operation in a string of operations, you make these things and then finally do the math, element by element, when you assign the result. There's papers on it on the internet and everything, comparing it to FORTRAN and such. Was one of the first uses of metaprogramming like template use in C++. Also in the book http://www.amazon.com/Scientific-Engineering-Introduction-Advanced-Techniques/dp/0201533936 <- keep in mind though that "advanced techniques" was in 94 :p. It's not as relevant today.

share|improve this answer
    
Or just move the modulo into the conversion operator. –  Ben Voigt Dec 14 '10 at 0:37
    
+1 for solving the root problem, rather than suggesting individual optimizations that the compiler may or may not already perform. –  jalf Dec 14 '10 at 0:57
    
Thanks a lot! I didn't dare to hope for an answer so detailed and useful. :-) –  Riccardo Murri Dec 14 '10 at 22:36
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Modulus is distributive over addition. Hence A % N + B % N == (A + B) % N

Regarding negative operand or modulus, last time I checked the C++ standard leaves the result to vendor discretion. So the above might not work with negatives.

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1  
For the integers, yes. For n-bit integers... not so much. –  Jørgen Fogh Dec 13 '10 at 22:34
    
I am not following you –  ThomasMcLeod Dec 13 '10 at 22:43
    
If A+B overflows A % N + B % N might not be equal to (A + B) % N, since A % N + B % N might not overflow. –  Jørgen Fogh Dec 13 '10 at 23:11
    
Besides, the right-hand side of the equation should have been (A%N+B%N)%N. –  Jørgen Fogh Dec 13 '10 at 23:12
1  
I didn't mean strictly equal, I meant congruent mod N. So if there are no overflows we can say that (A%N+B%N)%N == (A+B)%N –  ThomasMcLeod Dec 13 '10 at 23:23
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I can't tell for sure without knowing what the library is for, but it seems to me that this is probably too low level.

Since you worry about performance, I assume that your matrices are pretty large. That means that you will probably see much larger speed gains by using faster algorithms than trying to optimize stuff like this. The int coefficients will probably be faster, no matter what you do.

Even if you save a few mod-operations, the speedup will only be by a constant factor and probably less than 10x. Optimizing for the cache could probably give you more than this for most matrix operations.

My advice is to profile to see which operations are too slow and then google that operation and take a look at what algorithms exist (e.g. the Strassen algorithm for multiplication). You should be aware of how large your matrices are and if they are sparse or dense.

In any case, if you have to ask about this stuff, you are probably better off using an existing library anyway.

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