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Is there a better way to do this than to check for Exception string?

I would rather have this catch-all error handled on the page, but for SOAP exceptions (web-service calls) I need to log the details of the actual exception that occured on the server, not the client.

The ".Detail.InnerText" property isn't in a generic exception, and can only be gotten after casting a generic exception to a SOAP exception.

    protected void Page_Error(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Exception ex = Context.Server.GetLastError();

        if (ex.GetType().FullName == "System.Web.Services.Protocols.SoapException")
        {
            System.Web.Services.Protocols.SoapException realException = (System.Web.Services.Protocols.SoapException)ex;
            Response.Clear();

            Response.Output.Write(@"<div style='color:maroon; border:solid 1px maroon;'><pre>{0}</pre></div>", realException.Detail.InnerText);
            Response.Output.Write("<div style='color:maroon; border:solid 1px maroon;'><pre>{0}\n{1}</pre></div>", ex.Message, ex.StackTrace);

            Context.ClearError();
            Response.End();
        }
    }

I would think there is a way to get at the underlying Exception's type without using string comparison...

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Can you try somethink like this:

var ex = Context.Server.GetLastError();

var soapEx = ex as SoapException;
if(soapEx != null)
{
    //Handle SoapException
}
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Either use the as operator:

var ex = Context.Server.GetLastError();

var soapEx = ex as SoapException;
if(soapEx != null)
{
    //Handle SoapException
}

(See Dima's answer.)

Or compare type objects:

var ex = Context.Server.GetLastError();
if (ex.GetType() == typeof(SoapException) {
  ..
}

One assumes you will want to access some member of SoapException, the as approach avoids multiple type checks.

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if (ex is System.Web.Services.Protocols.SoapException)
{
    var soapEx = (System.Web.Services.Protocols.SoapException)ex;
    // do your thing
}
share|improve this answer
    
Slightly better to use as operator so only one cast operator is needed as in @Dima's answer. –  Richard Dec 13 '10 at 22:33
    
Very true - that does indeed shave off one cast opcode, although the savings isn't as clear-cut. IIRC, the instruction emitted for "as" casting is quite a bit more expensive than a C-style cast. Maybe "is" does the same thing, though. In any event, I tend to prefer my version for readability's sake. –  Ben Dec 13 '10 at 23:34

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