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def clean(self):
        cleaned_data = self.cleaned_data
        current_pass = cleaned_data['current_pass']
        new_pass = cleaned_data['new_pass']
        new_pass2 = cleaned_data['new_pass2']
        if current_pass or new_pass or new_pass2:
            if not current_pass:
                raise forms.ValidationError("- You must enter your current password.")
            if not new_pass:
                raise forms.ValidationError("- You must enter a new password.")
            if not new_pass2:
                raise forms.ValidationError("- You must re-confirm your new password.")
        return cleaned_data

Right now, I raise my errors. But this means that the other errors won't pop up. it ends the function when I raise the first one. What if I want to have all 3 errors?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A solution could be to bind those errors to the relevant fields, as explained in the docs.

Your code would look like this:

def clean(self):
    cleaned_data = self.cleaned_data
    current_pass = cleaned_data['current_pass']
    new_pass = cleaned_data['new_pass']
    new_pass2 = cleaned_data['new_pass2']
    if current_pass or new_pass or new_pass2:
        if not current_pass:
            self._errors["current_pass"] = self.error_class(["- You must enter your current password."])
        if not new_pass:
            self._errors["new_pass"] = self.error_class(["- You must enter a new password."])
        if not new_pass2:
            self._errors["new_pass2"] = self.error_class(["- You must re-confirm your new password."])
        del cleaned_data["current_pass"]
        del cleaned_data["new_pass"]
        del cleaned_data["new_pass2"]
    return cleaned_data

Please beware that I could not test it personally though.

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By using the clean method, you are doing per-form validation. The validator for the whole form has failed.

For individual fields, you should be using the clean_fieldname methods instead of clean which runs after individual field validation.

If you use the clean_fieldname, you can access the errors in forminstance.errors or forminstance.field.errors

def clean_current_pass(self):
    data = self.cleaned_data.get('current_pass'):
    if not data:
        raise forms.ValidationError('- You must enter your current password.')
    return data

def clean_new_pass(self):
    data = self.cleaned_data.get('new_pass'):
    if not data:
        raise forms.ValidationError("- You must enter a new password.")
    return data

def clean_new_pass2(self):
    data = self.cleaned_data.get('new_pass2'):
    if not data:
        raise forms.ValidationError('- You must re-confirm your new password.')
    return data

{{ myform.errors }} would give you all errors in your template.

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(This is a Python question not a Django question.)

This is as it should be: when an error is raised it should immediately propagate upwards until it's handled. You can't expect the rest of the function to be evaluated, because the error hasn't been dealt with yet!

Probably the easiest and cleanest method is to rewrite the code:

check = (current_pass, new_pass, new_pass2)
code = ("You must enter your current password.", ...)
err = ''.join(code for i, code in enumerate(codes) if check[i])
if err:
    raise forms.ValidationError(err)
share|improve this answer
    
So, I should put the errors in a list, and raise the list? –  TIMEX Dec 13 '10 at 23:51
    
No, you should raise one error, which you should create depending on which failures have occurred. –  katrielalex Dec 14 '10 at 1:46

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