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I have this classes on the same namespace:

public partial class BaseForm : Form
{    
    bool isNew = false;

    public BaseForm() {}


    public BaseForm(bool isNew)
    {
       InitializeComponent();

       this.isNew = isNew;
    }
    .
    .
    . 
}

public partial class BitSetForm : BaseForm
{

    public BitSetForm(bool isNew) : base(isNew)
    {
        InitializeComponent();           
    }

    new private void InitializeComponent()
    {
        .
        .
        .
    }
}

1) And I got this warning: Could not find type "..BaseForm," Please make sure that the assembly that contains this type is referenced. If this type is a part of your development project, make sure that the project has been successfully built using the setting for your current platform or Any CPU.

2) Design-Time Errors in the Windows Forms Designer appears and hiding the design pane of the "BitSetForm" win-form.

What does this mean? What can I do to make the design pane of the "BitSetForm" win-form display again?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to add a parameterless constructor to your BaseForm.
It can even be private; it just needs to exist.

Without one, the designer is unable to create an instance of the BaseForm to show in the design surface.

Remember to call InitializeComponent in the constructor.

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Well a couple things...

  1. You need to build your application before the designer can instantiate your base class. This can be very difficult if your subclass form has a bunch of errors.
  2. The designer can only instantiate a class that has a default parameterless constructor. So that means your base class's BaseForm(bool isNew) will never be called by the designer. Which means InitializeComponent will not either. You should move InitializeComponent to the parameterless constructor and have the second constructor call the first.
  3. InitializeComponent is private by default. You should not change its visibility to protected and since it's private, no new modifier is needed.
  4. InitializeComponent should never be chained that way to the base class. It should only be called by the constructor.

Given all those issues, I would highly recommend either giving up on Windows Forms inheritance or at least moving your base class into a separate assembly. I've tried it many times and it's more trouble than it's worth.

The key thing to remember is that when you're viewing a form in the designer, the designer is not creating an instance of the form you see - it's creating an instance of the base class. At runtime that is obviously not the case. So it's very common to see different runtime/design time behavior.

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The first item "need to build your application" helped me, thanks! –  allquixotic Apr 16 '13 at 21:17

As mentioned by @SLaks, you need the InitializeComponent in the constructor of your class. I would actually have it in the no-parameter instance. Then, in the constructor of you boolean, i would change to

public partial class BaseForm : Form 
{         
    bool isNew = false;      

    public BaseForm() 
    { 
        InitializeComponent(); 
    }

    public BaseForm(bool isNew) : this()
    {        

        this.isNew = isNew;
    }
}  

So if you had other stuff you wanted performed within your BaseForm definition regardless of a parameerized startup, that too would be called. This way, the InitializeComponent is triggeed in EITHER case.

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