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I'm thoroughly intrigued by Scheme, and have started with some toy programming examples, and am reading through Paul Graham's On Lisp.

One thing I haven't been able to find is a book or website intended to teach Scheme to "OO people", i.e. people like myself who've done 99 % of their coding in c++/Java/Python.

I see that closures are sort of object-y, in the sense that they have local state, and offer one or more functions that have access to that state. But I don't want to learn Scheme only to port my existing habits on to it. This is why I'm learning Scheme rather than Common Lisp at the moment; I fear that CLOS might just serve as a crutch to my existing OO habits.

What would be ideal is a book or website that offers case studies of problems solved in both an OO language, and also in Scheme in a Schemey way. I suppose I would most appreciate scientific computing and/or computer graphics problems, but anything would do.

Any pedagogical leads would be much appreciated.

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I don't think you'll find such a thing. When most people learn a new language, they try to learn it from that language's perspective, not another's. Moreover, OOP is far more complicated than functional. Check out The Little Schemer or SICP –  Rafe Kettler Dec 14 '10 at 6:08
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I doubt CLOS would serve as a crutch for old habits, I found it to be pretty different from the OO style in C++/Java/Python, and very interesting. I don't understand all the details, but I would recommend Peter Seibel's Practical Common Lisp. If you are reading On Lisp without much trouble, you should be able to dive into the chapters introducing CLOS in PCL. Also, I'd recommend his Google Tech Talk comparing Java and Common Lisp. –  spacemanaki Dec 14 '10 at 15:29
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@Rafe You'll find from reading my post that learning Scheme from its own perspective, without porting my OO thought patterns, is exactly what I'm trying to do. I'm hoping to bootstrap this process by seeing examples of OO and Scheme solutions to the same problem, especially when they look very different. –  SuperElectric Dec 14 '10 at 18:37
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I think it's a valid point. Precisely because its OO is so different, it can be a problem. In most languages, you define classes, and then define methods on them -- Peter wisely turns this around and does generic functions first, and defclass in the next chapter. Apparently this is a common place for Lisp programmers to reach: xach.livejournal.com/275444.html –  Ken Dec 14 '10 at 18:52
    
Thanks, @spacemanaki, for the nice links. If you re-post as an answer instead of a comment, I'd choose it as the answer to this question. –  SuperElectric Dec 14 '10 at 22:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I doubt CLOS would serve as a crutch for old habits, I found it to be pretty different from the OO style in C++/Java/Python, and very interesting. I don't understand all the details, but I would recommend Peter Seibel's Practical Common Lisp. If you are reading On Lisp without much trouble, you should be able to dive into the chapters introducing CLOS in PCL. Also, I'd recommend his Google Tech Talk comparing Java and Common Lisp.

Here's a few more recommendations to make this a more full-fledged answer:

The classic text Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs covers quite a few examples in chapter 3 of building modular systems using closures (and addresses issues with introducing state and mutability). Chapter 2 includes some generic and data/type-directed programming which could be helpful for motivating study of CLOS. This book really needs no introduction though, it's a towering work, and I've only been reading it slowly since the spring. Highly recommended if you are interested in Scheme.

While SICP is a great book, it's not without its flaws: A really interesting look at these is the essay "The Structure and Interpretation of the Computer Science Curriculum" which elaborates on a few criticism of SICP, and is written by the authors of How to Design Programs (I haven't read HTDP but I hear it's very good). While this essay won't teach you specifically what you are looking for - comparing functional and OO programming - it is really interesting anyway. Their freshman undergraduate course starts with a first semester introduction to functional programming using Scheme (I think, PLT/Racket) and is followed by a semester of OO programming with C++ or Java... at least that's the course they describe in the essay.

These slides from Peter Norvig address some of the design patterns common in OO programming and show why they are missing or unnecessary in dynamic, functional languages like Scheme and Lisp: http://norvig.com/design-patterns/

I cautiously recommend the book by the same authors as the Little Schemer books: A Little Java, A Few Patterns. I can't say for sure if this is a really a good book or not, it was incredibly strange and there are some really bad typesetting decisions (italic, serif, variable-width, superscript doesn't belong in a text on programming), but it might be interesting to take a look at. You can probably find it cheap, anyway. Don't take this recommendation that seriously. I think it would be better to stick to the Scheme texts.

p.s. I have to disagree with one comment stating that functional programming is not as complicated at OO programming, I think that's grossly misstating it. Functional programming in all its breadth is truly mind-boggling. When you go beyond map/filter/reduce and first-class functions, and take a look at other things in the functional realm like lazy evaluation, avoiding side effects and mutation, and the strong, static-typed languages, it gets pretty interesting, and is certainly just as complicated as traditional OO programming. I've only just scratched the surface myself but have discovered a great deal of new ideas. Programming is complicated business, whether OO or functional.

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Congrat you, my friend ! Love cs, love functional programming.

If you are python developer it takes 3-4 days to think in scheme

Here is the best simple tutorial I have ever met http://www.shido.info/lisp/idx_scm_e.html

I found this course http://cs.gettysburg.edu/~tneller/cs341/scheme-intro/index.html and it may be useful for you

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One beginner's resource that is very helpful and geared very much toward the casual reader is "The Adventures of a Pythonista in Schemeland". It's written (obviously) from the point of view of a Python programmer taking first steps with Scheme. One especially nice thing about it is that it includes an overview of the current implementations and compatibility issues between each scheme implementation, which, unfortunately, can cause some headaches when you're just starting out.

With regards to object systems, these two documents (linked from here) give nice examples of very simple toy implementations using closures that I found helpful in understanding their use in capturing state.

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The Pythonista link is very cool, thanks! –  SuperElectric Dec 16 '10 at 0:17

If you are starting off with Scheme, have a look at How to Design Programs. This book presents the "Schemey" approach to problem solving. I don't think there is a book that compares OO and functional solutions to the same programming problems. But there is a nice presentation that shows how dynamic languages like Scheme could provide simple solutions to problems that demand complex design patterns in statically typed OOP languages.

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