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Here is a picture I captured from < Professional IIS > alt text

I am wondering why the web request and the resulting web content as the response have to go through the same ISAPI filters or applications in a circle fashion. I know that ISAPI applications and Filters are nothing but Win32 DLLs. This circle fashion is kind of like a function call/return manner, i.e., when the web request comes, the exported functions of ISAPI Filters are invoked, and then the Filters invoke the WWW Service, and the WWW Service invoke the exported functions of ISAPI Applicaitons, and they return all the way back reversly. So is this the root cause? (I hope you understand what I mean.)

Many thanks.

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The root cause of what? –  leppie Dec 14 '10 at 7:26
    
I want to start a bounty, but I don't see the button to "start a bounty" –  smwikipedia Dec 18 '10 at 5:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Typically, in IIS, WWW service would server web content - it would map the resource to appropriate ISAPI Extension (or handler) - mapping is typically done on the basis of request resource extension. Its extension's responsibility to throw actual content (say html) that will be then returned back to browser via www service. ISAPI filters sits in between - they can modify the request before ISAPI extension/application can process it. Similarly, they can modify the response (content) generated by the application before it is returned to the browser.

I believe that following would be better resources to understand IIS Architecture

http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/101/introduction-to-iis-7-architecture/

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/843df643-1dbb-4fb6-910d-ec1965fa9e43.mspx?mfr=true

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