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I have the following function which takes url path and gets the reader. As i cannot close the reader and return it. Can the caller close the returned reader object.

public  XmlReader GetXMLContent(string Path)
        {
         XmlTextReader responseReader= new XmlTextReader(XmlUrlPath);                                                                                              
         return responseReader;
        }

 XmlTextReader myReader =  GetXMLContent("http://sample.xml");
 while() // loop through all the elements 
 {
 }

 myReader.close(); // close the reader
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, absolutely. When the method returns, the caller has effectively taken ownership of the reader (in this particular case).

Admittedly I'd use a using statement instead though:

using (XmlTextReader reader = GetXmlContent("http://sample.xml"))
{
    ...
}

... with your current proposed code, you won't close the reader if an exception is thrown.

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@jon i am adding reader to cache , i execute about code only if caching is null , so if is use using reader is closing the object –  kobe Dec 14 '10 at 7:45
    
@jon did i explain it clear?? i basically cache the sample.xml by using some key , i don't want to load everytime as it is a static file –  kobe Dec 14 '10 at 7:52
    
jon i saw your code properly , the method call itself is in using ,kool got it thanks –  kobe Dec 14 '10 at 7:53
    
@gov: Ah, you didn't mention the cache before. I would suggest that you don't cache disposable types such as XmlTextReader. Why not just read the whole document and cache it as an XDocument or XmlDocument? Caching an XmlReader is pretty pointless - either you end up having to "rewind" it (if that's even possible) or reading from wherever the previous caller had left it, neither of which is appealing. –  Jon Skeet Dec 14 '10 at 7:55
    
@jon , if you don't mind can you explain why we shouldn't cache xmlTextReader object , can you also suggest some good approach. Basically i have to write one function which can get xml file return a reader or so , i cannot keep making calls all the time as all the xml files are static,can you suggest good solution please –  kobe Dec 14 '10 at 7:59

You should not use the XmlTextReader constructor. You should use the facrory method in XmlReader. As described in the docs:

In the .NET Framework version 2.0 release, the recommended practice is to create XmlReader instances using the XmlReader.Create method. This allows you to take full advantage of the new features introduced in this release.

Unless your method was simplified for this post, this would also make you method obsolete.

using (XmlReader r = XmlReader.Create("http://sample.xml"))
{
   // read
}

In case you need that method, you'd do it this way:

public XmlReader GetXMLContent(string path)
{
    XmlReader responseReader = XmlReader.Create(path);   
    // do something special
    return responseReader;
}

using(XmlReader r = this.GetXMLContent("http://sample.xml"))
{
    // read
}
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i was using but i have to execute above code only if cache is null , if cache is present i will pull xmlreader from the cache , if i place the code inside that i cannot rturn the reader object as using is desposing the object –  kobe Dec 14 '10 at 7:50
    
As Jon said already, you really should think about your approach of caching disposable objects. It can get you into a lot of trouble. Why do need to cache them? –  bitbonk Dec 14 '10 at 7:58
    
thanks for your time –  kobe Dec 14 '10 at 8:10

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