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I have a tree that consists of several objects where each object has a name (string), id (int) and possibly an array of children, that are of the same type. How do I go through the entire tree and print out all of the ids and names?

I'm new to programming and frankly, I'm having trouble wraping my head around this because I don't know how many levels there are. Right now I'm using a foreach loop to fetch the parent objects directly below rot, put this means I cannot get the children...

Thank you!

/BeafTurkey

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I agree. Keep it simple using Recursion. –  Roy Astro Jan 14 '09 at 16:54
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3 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

An algorithm which uses recursion goes like this:

printNode(Node node)
{
  printTitle(node.title)
  foreach (Node child in node.children)
  {
    printNode(child); //<-- recursive
  }
}

Here's a version which also keeps track of how deeply nested the recursion is (i.e. whether we're printing children of the root, grand-children, great-grand-children, etc.):

printRoot(Node node)
{
  printNode(node, 0);
}

printNode(Node node, int level)
{
  printTitle(node.title)
  foreach (Node child in node.children)
  {
    printNode(child, level + 1); //<-- recursive
  }
}
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If you have some time to read this article, that explain some theory and shows you some implementations of trees and various visits.

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Wow, that was a very useful link! –  BeefTurkey Jan 14 '09 at 16:51
    
You're welcome :) –  Stefano Driussi Jan 14 '09 at 21:50
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Well, you could always use recursion, but in a "real world" programming scenario, it can lead to bad things if you don't keep track of the depth.

Here's an example used for a binary tree: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/BinarySearchTree.aspx

I would google linked lists and other tree structures if you're new to the whole data structure thing. There's a wealth of knowledge to be had.

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Would you illustrate the alternative to using recursion (i.e. a non-recursive version of my example pseudo-code)? –  ChrisW Jan 14 '09 at 16:43
    
I think it would be a little big and unwieldy. Your example is definitely the simplest, and easiest for him to grasp. I was just trying to stress that recursion is usually a bad idea in a production environment. –  Alex Fort Jan 14 '09 at 16:46
    
If you put in the proper checks to be sure it never infinitately recurses, why is it a bad idea? We use recursion in a couple of places in our production environment but limit the level it recurses. –  Tom Anderson Jan 14 '09 at 16:49
    
You need to keep track of the context somehow: so if you're not going to recurse (keeping context on the program stack), then you need to keep it on the heap (perhaps by using a local variable of type Stack)? I'm not sure why you say that's "usually a bad idea", assuming any sensibly-depthed tree? –  ChrisW Jan 14 '09 at 16:52
    
If you implement it like Tom Anderson mentioned, by keeping track of the depth and limiting it, then there's no real problem with it. For a new programmer though, it's pretty easy to get into a stack overflow situation. –  Alex Fort Jan 14 '09 at 16:54
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