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Is there a way to pass a call back function in a Java method?

The behavior I'm trying to mimic is a .Net Delegate being passed to a function.

I've seen people suggesting creating a separate object but that seems overkill, however I am aware that sometimes overkill is the only way to do things.

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21  
It's overkill because Java is nonfunctional (that's supposed to be a pun...). –  Kazark Aug 12 '11 at 18:54

10 Answers 10

up vote 84 down vote accepted

If you mean somthing like .NET anonymous delegate, I think Java's anonymous class can be used as well.

public class Main {

    public interface Visitor{
        int doJob(int a, int b);
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Visitor adder = new Visitor(){
            public int doJob(int a, int b) {
                return a + b;
            }
        };

        Visitor multiplier = new Visitor(){
            public int doJob(int a, int b) {
                return a*b;
            }
        };

        System.out.println(adder.doJob(10, 20));
        System.out.println(multiplier.doJob(10, 20));

    }
}
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1  
This is the canonical method since Java 1.0. –  Charlie Martin Jan 14 '09 at 17:05
1  
I've been usign this, it's slioghtly more verbose than what I'd like, but it works. –  Omar Kooheji Oct 1 '09 at 16:02
13  
@Omar, agreed. I've come back to Java after a long stint with C# and really miss lambdas/delegates. Come on Java! –  Drew Noakes May 2 '11 at 14:56
1  
@DrewNoakes, good news is, Java 8 has lambdas (mostly)... –  Lucas Apr 1 '13 at 15:29
1  
@thermz done. thanks! –  Gant Dec 17 '13 at 12:59

You can use an interface. See here: http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/javatips/jw-javatip10.html

Alex

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A little nitpicking:

I've seem people suggesting creating a separate object but that seems overkill

Passing a callback includes creating a separate object in pretty much any OO language, so it can hardly be considered overkill. What you probably mean is that in Java, it requires you to create a separate class, which is more verbose (and more resource-intensive) than in languages with explicit first-class functions or closures. However, anonymous classes at least reduce the verbosity and can be used inline.

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7  
Yes that is what i meant. With 30 or so events you end up with 30 classes. –  Omar Kooheji Oct 1 '09 at 15:46

I found the idea of implementing using the reflect library interesting and came up with this which I think works quite well. The only down side is losing the compile time check that you are passing valid parameters.

public class CallBack {
    private String methodName;
    private Object scope;

    public CallBack(Object scope, String methodName) {
        this.methodName = methodName;
        this.scope = scope;
    }

    public Object invoke(Object... parameters) throws InvocationTargetException, IllegalAccessException, NoSuchMethodException {
        Method method = scope.getClass().getMethod(methodName, getParameterClasses(parameters));
        return method.invoke(scope, parameters);
    }

    private Class[] getParameterClasses(Object... parameters) {
        Class[] classes = new Class[parameters.length];
        for (int i=0; i < classes.length; i++) {
            classes[i] = parameters[i].getClass();
        }
        return classes;
    }
}

You use it like this

public class CallBackTest {
    @Test
    public void testCallBack() throws NoSuchMethodException, InvocationTargetException, IllegalAccessException {
        TestClass testClass = new TestClass();
        CallBack callBack = new CallBack(testClass, "hello");
        callBack.invoke();
        callBack.invoke("Fred");
    }

    public class TestClass {
        public void hello() {
            System.out.println("Hello World");
        }

        public void hello(String name) {
            System.out.println("Hello " + name);
        }
    }
}
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Looks a bit like overkill (/me ducks) –  Diederik Mar 15 '12 at 13:25

A method is not (yet) a first-class object in Java; you can't pass a function pointer as a callback. Instead, create an object (which usually implements an interface) that contains the method you need and pass that.

Proposals for closures in Java—which would provide the behavior you are looking for—have been made, but none will be included in the upcoming Java 7 release.

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"A method is not (yet) a first-class object in Java" -- well, there's the method class[1], of which you can certainly pass around instances. It's not the clean, idiomatic, OO code that you'd expect from java, but it might be expedient. Certainly something to consider, though. [1] java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/reflect/Method.html –  Jonas Kölker May 17 '09 at 10:34

When I need this kind of functionality in Java, I usually use the Observer pattern. It does imply an extra object, but I think it's a clean way to go, and is a widely understood pattern, which helps with code readability.

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Check the closures how they have been implemented in the lambdaj library. They actually have a behavior very similar to C# delegates:

http://code.google.com/p/lambdaj/wiki/Closures

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I tried using java.lang.reflect to implement 'callback', here's a sample:

package StackOverflowQ443708_JavaCallBackTest;

import java.lang.reflect.*;
import java.util.concurrent.*;

class MyTimer
{
    ExecutorService EXE =
        //Executors.newCachedThreadPool ();
        Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor ();

    public static void PrintLine ()
    {
        System.out.println ("--------------------------------------------------------------------------------");
    }

    public void SetTimer (final int timeout, final Object obj, final String methodName, final Object... args)
    {
        SetTimer (timeout, obj, false, methodName, args);
    }
    public void SetTimer (final int timeout, final Object obj, final boolean isStatic, final String methodName, final Object... args)
    {
        Class<?>[] argTypes = null;
        if (args != null)
        {
            argTypes = new Class<?> [args.length];
            for (int i=0; i<args.length; i++)
            {
                argTypes[i] = args[i].getClass ();
            }
        }

        SetTimer (timeout, obj, isStatic, methodName, argTypes, args);
    }
    public void SetTimer (final int timeout, final Object obj, final String methodName, final Class<?>[] argTypes, final Object... args)
    {
        SetTimer (timeout, obj, false, methodName, argTypes, args);
    }
    public void SetTimer (final int timeout, final Object obj, final boolean isStatic, final String methodName, final Class<?>[] argTypes, final Object... args)
    {
        EXE.execute (
            new Runnable()
            {
                public void run ()
                {
                    Class<?> c;
                    Method method;
                    try
                    {
                        if (isStatic) c = (Class<?>)obj;
                        else c = obj.getClass ();

                        System.out.println ("Wait for " + timeout + " seconds to invoke " + c.getSimpleName () + "::[" + methodName + "]");
                        TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep (timeout);
                        System.out.println ();
                        System.out.println ("invoking " + c.getSimpleName () + "::[" + methodName + "]...");
                        PrintLine ();
                        method = c.getDeclaredMethod (methodName, argTypes);
                        method.invoke (obj, args);
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        PrintLine ();
                    }
                }
            }
        );
    }
    public void ShutdownTimer ()
    {
        EXE.shutdown ();
    }
}

public class CallBackTest
{
    public void onUserTimeout ()
    {
        System.out.println ("onUserTimeout");
    }
    public void onTestEnd ()
    {
        System.out.println ("onTestEnd");
    }
    public void NullParameterTest (String sParam, int iParam)
    {
        System.out.println ("NullParameterTest: String parameter=" + sParam + ", int parameter=" + iParam);
    }
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        CallBackTest test = new CallBackTest ();
        MyTimer timer = new MyTimer ();

        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), test, "onUserTimeout");
        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), test, "onTestEnd");
        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), test, "A-Method-Which-Is-Not-Exists");    // java.lang.NoSuchMethodException

        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), System.out, "println", "this is an argument of System.out.println() which is called by timer");
        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), System.class, true, "currentTimeMillis");
        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), System.class, true, "currentTimeMillis", "Should-Not-Pass-Arguments");    // java.lang.NoSuchMethodException

        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), String.class, true, "format", "%d %X", 100, 200); // java.lang.NoSuchMethodException
        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), String.class, true, "format", "%d %X", new Object[]{100, 200});

        timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), test, "NullParameterTest", new Class<?>[]{String.class, int.class}, null, 888);

        timer.ShutdownTimer ();
    }
}
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How do you pass null as an arg? –  TWiStErRob Feb 17 '13 at 10:05
    
@TWiStErRob, in this sample, it would be like timer.SetTimer ((int)(Math.random ()*10), System.out, "printf", "%s: [%s]", new Object[]{"null test", null});. output will be null test: [null] –  LiuYan 刘研 Feb 17 '13 at 17:10
    
Wouldn't it NPE on args[i].getClass()? My point is that it doesn't work if you select method based on argument types. It works with String.format, but may not work with something else which accepts null. –  TWiStErRob Feb 17 '13 at 17:23
    
@TWiStErRob, Good point! I've added a function which can manually pass argTypes array, so now we can pass null argument/parameter without NullPointerException occured. Sample output: NullParameterTest: String parameter=null, int parameter=888 –  LiuYan 刘研 Feb 17 '13 at 18:59

For simplicity, you can use a Runnable:

private void runCallback(Runnable callback)
{
    // Run callback
    callback.run();
}

Usage:

runCallback(new Runnable()
{
    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        // Running callback
    }
});
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it's a bit old, but nevertheless... I found the answer of Peter Wilkinson nice except for the fact that it does not work for primitive types like int/Integer. The problem is the ".getClass()" for the parameters[i], which returns for instance java.lang.Integer , which on the other hand will not be correctly interpreted by getMethod(methodName,parameters[]) (Java's fault) ...

I combined it with the suggestion of Daniel Spiewak (in his answer to this); steps to success included: catching "NoSuchMethodException" -> getMethods() -> looking for the matching one by method.getName(), -> and then explicitly looping through the list of parameters and applying Daniels solution, such identifying the type matches and the signature matches;

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