Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can we expose interfaces in Ruby like we do in java and enforce the Ruby modules or classes to implement the methods defined by interface.

One way is to use inheritance and method_missing to achieve the same but is there any other more appropriate approach available ?

share|improve this question
    
5  
You should double ask Yourself why You even need this. Often enough interfaces are used just to get damn thing compiled which isn't a problem in ruby. –  Arnis L. Dec 14 '10 at 11:59
    
This question may or may not be considered a duplicate of [ In Ruby, what is the equivalent to an interface in C#? ](StackOverflow.Com/q/3505521/#3507460). –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 14 '10 at 13:42
2  
Why I need this ? I want to implement something you can call as "versionable" which makes the documents/files versionable but versionable using what .... For e.g. I can make it versionable using existing repository softwares like SVN or CVS. Whatever unerlying mechanism I choose it should provide some basic minimum functions. I want to use interface like thing to enforce the implementation of these bare minimum functions by any new underlying repository implementation. –  crazycrv Dec 15 '10 at 9:58

6 Answers 6

Ruby has Interfaces just like any other language.

Note that you have to be careful not to conflate the concept of the Interface, which is an abstract specification of the responsibilities, guarantees and protocols of a unit with the concept of the interface which is a keyword in the Java, C# and VB.NET programming languages. In Ruby, we use the former all the time, but the latter simply doesn't exist.

It is very important to distinguish the two. What's important is the Interface, not the interface. The interface tells you pretty much nothing useful. Nothing demonstrates this better than the marker interfaces in Java, which are interfaces that have no members at all: just take a look at java.io.Serializable and java.lang.Cloneable; those two interfaces mean very different things, yet they have the exact same signature.

So, if two interfaces that mean different things, have the same signature, what exactly is the interface even guaranteeing you?

Another good example:

package java.util;

interface List<E> implements Collection<E>, Iterable<E> {
    void add(int index, E element)
        throws UnsupportedOperationException, ClassCastException,
            NullPointerException, IllegalArgumentException,
            IndexOutOfBoundsException;
}

What is the Interface of java.util.List<E>.add?

  • that the length of the collection does not decrease
  • that all the items that were in the collection before are still there
  • that element is in the collection

And which of those actually shows up in the interface? None! There is nothing in the interface that says that the Add method must even add at all, it might just as well remove an element from the collection.

This is a perfectly valid implementation of that interface:

class MyCollection<E> implements java.util.List<E> {
    void add(int index, E element)
        throws UnsupportedOperationException, ClassCastException,
            NullPointerException, IllegalArgumentException,
            IndexOutOfBoundsException {
        remove(element);
    }
}

Another example: where in java.util.Set<E> does it actually say that it is, you know, a set? Nowhere! Or more precisely, in the documentation. In English.

In pretty much all cases of interfaces, both from Java and .NET, all the relevant information is actually in the docs, not in the types. So, if the types don't tell you anything interesting anyway, why keep them at all? Why not stick just to documentation? And that's exactly what Ruby does.

Note that there are other languages in which the Interface can actually be described in a meaningful way. However, those languages typically don't call the construct which describes the Interface "interface", they call it type. In a dependently-typed programming language, you can for example express the properties that a sort function returns a collection of the same length as the original, that every element which is in the original is also in the sorted collection and that no bigger element appears before a smaller element.

So, in short: Ruby does not have an equivalent to a Java interface. It does however have an equivalent to a Java Interface, and its exactly the same as in Java: documentation.

Also, just like in Java, Acceptance Tests can be used to specify *Interface*s as well.

In particular, in Ruby, the Interface of an object is determined by what it can do, not what class is is, or what module it mixes in. Any object that has a << method can be appended to. This is very useful in unit tests, where you can simply pass in an Array or a String instead of a more complicated Logger, even though Array and Logger do not share an explicit interface apart from the fact that they both have a method called <<.

Another example is StringIO, which implements the same Interface as IO and thus a large portion of the Interface of File, but without sharing any common ancestor besides Object.

share|improve this answer
99  
While a good read I don't find the answer that helpful. It reads like a dissertation on why interface is useless, missing the point of its use. It would have been easier to say that ruby is dynamically typed and that has a different focus in mind and make concepts like IOC unnecessary/unwanted. It is a hard shift if you are used to Design by Contract. Something Rails could benefit from, which the core team realized as you can see on latest versions. –  goliatone Dec 7 '11 at 13:44
6  
Follow up question: what's the best way to document an interface in Ruby? A Java keyword interface may not provide all the relevant info, but it does provide an obvious place to put documentation. I've written a class in Ruby that implements (enough of) IO, but I did it by trial and error and wasn't too happy with the process. I've also written multiple implementations of an interface of my own, but documenting which methods are required and what they are supposed to do so that other members of my team could create implementations proved a challenge. –  Patrick Feb 9 '12 at 2:53
1  
I don't care what 27 people above me thing, you sir, have nailed it. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 30 '13 at 17:05
2  
The interface construct is indeed only needed to treat different types as the same in statically typed single-inheritance languages (e.g. treat LinkedHashSet and ArrayList both as a Collection), it has pretty much nothing do with Interface as this answer shows. Ruby is not statically typed so there is no need for the construct. –  Esailija Jun 9 '13 at 14:28
2  
I read this as "some interfaces make no sense, therefore interfaces are bad. Why would you want to use interfaces?". It doesn't answer the question and frankly just sounds like someone who doesn't understand what interfaces are for and their been benefit. –  Oddman Feb 21 at 13:52

Try rspec's "shared examples":

https://www.relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-core/v/3-0/docs/example-groups/shared-examples

You write a spec for your interface and then put one line in each implementer's spec, eg.

it_behaves_like "my interface"
share|improve this answer
1  
I do believe that this should be the accepted answer. This is the way most type weak languages can provide Java like interfaces. The accepted one explains why Ruby does not have interfaces, not how to emulate them. –  SystematicFrank Jan 16 at 13:45

The real concept of interface does not exist in Ruby, but there is a mechanism to simulate it.

Take a look to this post

share|improve this answer
    
nice workaround. –  njasm Jul 13 at 0:14

There are no such things as interfaces in the Java way. But there are other things you can enjoy in ruby.

If you want to implement some kind of types and interface - so that the objects can be checked whether they has some methods/messages you require from them -, you can then take a look at rubycontracts. It defines a mechanism similar to the PyProtocols. A blog about type checking in ruby is here.

The mentioned approached are not living projects, although the goal seems to be nice at first, it seems that most of the ruby developers can live without strict type checking. But the flexibility of ruby enables to implement type checking.

If you want to extend objects or classes (the same thing in ruby) by certain behaviors or somewhat have the ruby way of multiple inheritance, use the include or extend mechanism. With include you can include methods from another class or module into an object. With extend you can add behavior to a class, so that its instances will have the added methods. That was a very short explanation though.

I my opinion the best way to resolve the Java interface need is to understand the ruby object model (see Dave Thomas lectures for instance). Probably you will forget about Java interfaces. Or you have an exceptional application on your schedule.

share|improve this answer

As everyone here said, there is no interface system for ruby. But through introspection, you can implement it yourself quite easily. Here is a simple example that can be improved in many ways to help you get started:

class Object
  def interface(method_hash)
    obj = new
    method_hash.each do |k,v|
      if !obj.respond_to?(k) || !((instance_method(k).arity+1)*-1)
        raise NotImplementedError, "#{obj.class} must implement the method #{k} receiving #{v} parameters"
      end
    end
  end
end

class Person
  def work(one,two,three)
    one + two + three
  end

  def sleep
  end

  interface({:work => 3, :sleep => 0})
end

Removing one of the methods declared on Person or change it number of arguments will raise a NotImplementedError.

share|improve this answer

Can we expose interfaces in Ruby like we do in java and enforce the Ruby modules or classes to implement the methods defined by interface.

Ruby does not have that functionality. In principle, it does not need them as Ruby uses what is called duck typing.

There are few approaches you can take.

Write implementations that raise exceptions; if a subclass attempts to use the unimplemented method, it will fail

class CollectionInterface
  def add(something)
    raise 'not implemented'
  end
end

Along with above, you should write testing code that enforces your contracts (what other post here incorrectly call Interface)

If you find yourself writing void methods like above all the time, then write a helper module that captures that

module Interface
  def method(name)
    define_method(name) { |*args|
      raise "interface method #{name} not implemented"
    }
  end
end

class Collection
  extend Interface
  method :add
  method :remove
end

Now, combine the above with Ruby modules and you are close to what you want...

module Interface
  def method(name)
    define_method(name) { |*args|
      raise "interface method #{name} not implemented"
    }
  end
end

module Collection
  extend Interface
  method :add
  method :remove
end

col = Collection.new # <-- fails, as it should

And then you can do

class MyCollection
  include Collection

  def add(thing)
    puts "Adding #{thing}"
  end
end

c1 = MyCollection.new
c1.add(1)     # <-- output 'Adding 1'
c1.remove(1)  # <-- fails with not implemented

Let me emphasise once again: this is a rudimentary, as everything in Ruby happens at runtime; there is no compile time checking. If you couple this with testing, then you should be able to pick up errors. Even further, if you take the above further, you could probably be able to write an Interface that performs checking on the class first time an object of that class is created; making your tests as simple as calling MyCollection.new... yeah, over the top :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.