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I'm trying to find and replace a string in a folder of files.

Could someone possibly help me?

My script is as follows:

#!/bin/bash
OLD="This is a"
NEW="I am a"
DPATH="/home/user/test/*.txt"
BPATH="/home/user/test/backup/foo"
[ ! -d $BPATH ] && mkdir -p $BPATH || :
for f in $DPATH
do
  if [ -f $f -a -r $f ]; then
    /bin/cp -f $f $BPATH
    sed "s/$OLD/$NEW/g" "$f"
   else
    echo "Error: Cannot read $f"
  fi
done

Now this seems to find the string 'This is a' and replaces with 'I am a', but this only prints to screen.

I need it to replace in the files themselves.

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Use the -i option of sed to make the changes in place:

sed -i "s/$OLD/$NEW/g" "$f"
    ^^
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Worked great! I knew I'd missed something. Thanks –  terrid25 Dec 14 '10 at 10:33
    
Ok, is there an easy way to modify my shell script, so that it will check in subfolders? /home/user/test/xyz ? –  terrid25 Dec 14 '10 at 10:43
    
#!bin/bash OLD="This is a" NEW="I am a" BPATH="/home/user/backup/foo" find . -name '*.shtml' -type f | while read filename do /bin/cp -f $filename $BPATH sed -i "s/$OLD/$NEW/g" $filename done –  terrid25 Dec 14 '10 at 11:28

The output goes to screen (stdout) because of the following:

sed "s/$OLD/$NEW/g" "$f"

Try redirecting to a file (the following redirects to a new files and then renames it to overwrite the original file):

sed "s/$OLD/$NEW/g" "$f" > "$f.new" && mv "$f.new" "$f"
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That creates a .text.new file and the original file, example.txt is overwritten and is blank. Any ideas why? –  terrid25 Dec 14 '10 at 10:32
    
@user390426: It could be because aix didn't quote the variables "$f.new"' (two places) and "$f". Also, the mv` shouldn't be unconditional. Instead, it should be sed ... && mv .... –  Dennis Williamson Dec 14 '10 at 11:07
    
@Dennis Thanks for the suggestions. I've edited the post. –  NPE Dec 14 '10 at 11:26
    
Ok, I have now changed $OLD to be a URL and it returns an error: sed: couldn't open file ww.google.co.uk//g: No such file or directory the 'sed' command doesn't seem to like the // part of the url. Is there a way to overcome this? –  terrid25 Dec 14 '10 at 12:48
1  
@user390426: Change the delimiter in the sed command: "s|$OLD|$NEW|g". –  Dennis Williamson Dec 14 '10 at 15:13

this is a snippet i use, it removes all stuff between APA and BEPA (across multiple lines, including removing APA, BEPA) in all files below current directory, exclude the .svn directory

find . \! -path '*.svn*' -type f -exec sed -i -n '1h;1!H;${;g;s/APA[ \t\r\n]*BEPA//g;p}' {} \;
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Check this out

http://cs.boisestate.edu/~amit/teaching/handouts/cs-unix/node130.html

##########################################################
\#!/bin/sh

\# sed/changeword

prog=`basename $0`

case $# in
0|1) echo 'Usage:' $prog '<old string> <new string>'; exit 1;;
esac

old=$1
new=$2
for f in *
do
        if test "$f" != "$prog"

        then
            if test -f "$f"
            then
                sed "s/$old/$new/g" $f > $f.new
                mv $f $f.orig
                mv $f.new $f
                echo $f done
            fi
        fi
done

##############################################################
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