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Given a trait T

trait T {
  def v: Int
  def +(t: T): T
}

the following class A

case class A(v: Int) extends T {
  def +(a: A) = A(v + a.v)
}

is not a valid subtype of T. The implementation of A.+ is too restrictive, because it only accepts elements of type A whereas the signature of T.+ requires all implementations to be able to accept objects of type T and not just objects of type A. So far, so reasonable.

If I'd like to allow implementations of T to be that restrictive I can modify the declarations of T and A as follows

trait T[This <: T[This]] {
  def v: Int
  def +(t: This): This
}

case class A(v: Int) extends T[A] {
  def +(a: A) = A(v + a.v)
}

which obviously blows up the type signature.

Is there another way to declare that implementations of T only need to be compatible with objects of their own type?

1st EDIT In reply to Landei's answer below:

While self-types indeed shorten the current signature they don't shorten other signatures where T occurs, e.g.

trait C[D <: T[D], S] { self: S =>
  def +(perm: D): S
  def matches(other: S): Boolean
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use self-types:

trait T[S] {
  self:S => 
  def v: Int
  def +(t: S): S
}

case class A(v: Int) extends T[A] {
  def +(a: A) = A(v + a.v)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please see my "1st EDIT" above. Thanks nevertheless, I did not consider self-type annotations before. –  Malte Schwerhoff Dec 14 '10 at 12:33
1  
I don't know a general solution for this. Depending on your intentions and class hierarchy the type class pattern (using implicit) might be applicable (see Numeric for an example). Another try would be type variables (in order to pull D "inside" the trait). –  Landei Dec 14 '10 at 17:59

You can do it with type members. I don't know what brand of "short" you're after here exactly. There is some redundancy, but on the other hand no type parameters passes big bracket savings on to you.

trait TT {
  type This <: TT
  def v: Int
  def +(t: This): This
}
case class AA(v: Int) extends TT {
  type This = AA
  def +(a: This) = AA(v + a.v)
}
share|improve this answer
    
The difference to my suggestion is that you can assign any subtype of TT to This. I think mhs wants to restrict This to the type of the class itself. However, how would the answer to the follow-up question (with trait D) look like with your approach? –  Landei Dec 17 '10 at 14:36

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