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Some time ago I came across the following construct which I have rarely seen since, though I use it relatively frequently. I use it typically when checking on a whole list of conditions are true and it prevents large levels of indentation. Essentially it uses a for loop to provide a kind of structured goto. My question is firstly whether there is better way to structure this, secondly whether people like it and thirdly whether a new keyword in java/c++ etc. such as unit { } which would only cause breaks to exit to the end of the unit would be useful and clearer.

ps I realise that it is on slip away from an infinite loop, but I think my paranoia about that has meant its never happened.

Edit: I have added some setup code for the further conditions to try to illuminate problems with chained if then elses

boolean valid = false;

// this loop never loops
for (;;)
{
    if (!condition1)
        break;

    condition2.setup();

    if (!condition2)
        break;

    condition3.setup();

    if (!condition3)
        break;

    valid = true;
    break;
}

if (valid) dosomething();

EDIT:

I have just discovered that in fact there is a way to structure this in java without misusing loops etc. and wondered whether this would similarily be frowned on, though I guess I have missed the boat on this one.

The restructured code looks like this.

boolean valid = false;

breakout:
{
    if (!condition1)
        break breakout;

    condition2.setup();

    if (!condition2)
        break breakout;

    condition3.setup();

    if (!condition3)
        break breakout;

    valid = true;
}

if (valid) dosomething();

Now that removes the misuse of the for loop which caused a lot of the complaints, and is actually a solution I think is quite neat and is what I was looking to find originally. I am guessing that this structure is probably not well known since no one mentioned it, people object to this as strongly?

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3  
As noted below this is just a really confusing way of writing an AND statement. –  Samuel Parsonage Dec 14 '10 at 12:43
8  
Oh man, a classic one - // this loop never loops –  Petar Minchev Dec 14 '10 at 12:46
4  
This is code that belongs on thedailywtf.com –  Jesper Dec 14 '10 at 13:00
2  
If you want goto, you can always just, you know, use goto. Despite what people say, it's not unethical. –  j_random_hacker Dec 14 '10 at 13:12
1  
Ah, I see, I guess a cursory glance through edit history should be mandatory before one puts one's foot in mouth... :) –  Nim Dec 14 '10 at 13:19

12 Answers 12

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't think it's the most readable way of doing it. Chained if-else if looks much better. But if you want to stick with it and don't want to be so close to an infinite loop, you could do something like this:

do
{
    if (...)
        break;
    ...
} while (false);
share|improve this answer
    
I agree the loop is better, might even start using it. Just wondering whether it still offends stylistically. The problem with chained if then elses is when condition2 needs some work doing before it can be evaluated and you end up indenting and indenting. –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 12:41
2  
Refactor, my friend. Setup + evaluation == one boolean method! –  romacafe Dec 14 '10 at 12:57
1  
This IMHO is the only correct way to do it and retain the semantics of the short snippet! –  Nim Dec 14 '10 at 13:14
    
I would go as far as to say, that you don't need the valid boolean, the dosomething() should be the last statement in the while loop. –  Nim Dec 14 '10 at 13:17
    
Accepted this as the answer largely because its a better way of doing the same thing. I have however learnt from nearly every answer to use this only for my own private code since it seems a pretty unpopular/opaque construct! –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 21:53

The loop is counter-intuitive and would be questioned at code review: "Why do you need a loop if you always break on the first iteration?"

Why not use this?

boolean valid = true;

if (!condition1)
    valid = false;

else if (!condition2)
    valid = false;

else if (!condition3)
    valid = false;

if (valid) dosomething();
share|improve this answer
10  
I'd bleeding shoot any programmer of mine that used that loop construct ;) –  Goz Dec 14 '10 at 12:31
    
I do accept that a for loop that doesnt loop is counter-intuitive (which is why I was suggesting the unit keyword), but once you are familiar with the construct (and I know this is a matter of taste) I find it easier to understand than your answer. Plus your answer is really hiding the indentation which might not be possible is a more complicated example. –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 12:35
3  
OMG seriously, unless I'm completely missing something isn't he just writing if (condition1 && condition2 && condition3) {doSomething()} in the most confusing way possible? –  Samuel Parsonage Dec 14 '10 at 12:39
    
@aronp: I fail to see the problem with indentation, could you explain? –  prasopes Dec 14 '10 at 12:44
1  
@aronp: where do you see 4 levels of indentation in this answer? There is only one level. –  jalf Dec 14 '10 at 13:08

You may have heard of these things modern programming languages have, called functions ;) One of the key reasons goto is no longer used is that we can now factor code out into separate functions, and call them instead.

One way to solve your problem would be to put the code in a separate function instead, and return instead of breaking from your pseudo-loop:

void safedosomething() {
    if (!condition1)
        return;

    condition2.setup();

    if (!condition2)
        return;

    condition3.setup();

    if (!condition3)
        return;

    dosomething();
}

or write helper functions (such as bool checkcondition1() { condition1.setup(); return condition1; }) which set up and then test the conditions, and use a boolean flag:

bool valid = true;

if (!checkcondition1())
    valid = false;

if (!checkcondition2())
    valid = false;

if (!checkcondition3())
    valid = false;

if (!checkcondition4())
    valid = false;

if (valid) dosomething();

or a bit more concisely:

bool valid = true;

valid &&= checkcondition1();
valid &&= checkcondition2();
valid &&= checkcondition3();
valid &&= checkcondition4();

if (valid) dosomething();

or just

if (checkcondition1()
  && checkcondition2()
  && checkcondition3()
  && checkcondition4())
    dosomething();

There are plenty of ways to express this, without counterintuitive loops-that-don't-loop.

share|improve this answer
    
I think your first answer deals with the more complicated situations best, but dont you think that you are using multiple return points to effectively implement goto's. Is that really that much better, plus the function might actually have a big fat interface as well, just to check three conditions. Made me think! –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 13:47
    
@aronp: yes, I use multiple return points, but I don't see a problem with that. It may be an issue in C, because you have no automatic way to perform cleanup when returning, but in C++, with RAII, there is no problem with multiple returns. And yes, from a code clarity point of view, it is a lot better. If the function has a very complicated interface one option (apart from simplifying it, perhaps by refactoring the individual conditions), could be to write the function as a C++0x lambda, so it can capture local variables implicitly. –  jalf Dec 14 '10 at 19:07

The reason for this construct is because goto is a dirty word in programming. But lets face it, you are effectively using the loop construct to do the same thing. My opinion on this is either be honest and use the goto or refactor the code.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it is slightly more structured than goto, but get the point. –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 13:20
1  
@aronp I think it's precisely a goto , BUT it's less readable because it doesn't actually use the goto keyword. –  Mark B Dec 14 '10 at 14:43

C++ only, unfortunately:

if ( condition1
     && (condition2.setup(), condition2)
     && (condition3.setup(), condition3) )
{
    dosomething();
}

For something java compatible (but I'm still writing C++!) I would fall back to something along the lines of this. (Obviously, some context may need to be passed into CheckConditions().)

bool CheckConditions()
{
    if (!condition1)
        return false;

    condition2.setup();

    if (!condition2)
        return false;

    condition3.setup();

    if (!condition3)
        return false;

    return true;
}

//...
if (CheckConditions())
{
    dosomething();
}
//...
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting use of brackets! Again not sure I like relying on order of evaluation in expressions (across languages etc) but clever. –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 14:10
1  
@aronp: The order of evaluation is guaranteed. Both , and && imply sequence points. –  Charles Bailey Dec 14 '10 at 14:10
    
I realise that, but that is for c++. I dont know about across all languages where this construct could be used, and I dont know that everyone else knows that. I just prefer not to rely on it. –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 14:23
    
@aronp: I did say "C++ only" and it was one of the two languages that you asked about. The question is academic for the other language as java does not have a comma operator. Both languages guarantee short-circuiting for &&. I have updated with a solution that is applicable to java as well. –  Charles Bailey Dec 14 '10 at 14:59
    
now we're talking... this answer actually duplicates the code specified, unlike the first answer. –  Dov Dec 14 '10 at 16:59

You seem concerned that evaluating condition 2 requires some setup, and you don't know where to put it. Refactor that into a separate boolean method and then use that the way almost everybody here has described. For example:

if (checkCondition1() && checkCondition2(someInput) && checkCondition3()) {
    doSomething();
}

and..

private boolean checkCondition2(Object someInput) {
    //setup condition 2
    return condition2;
}
share|improve this answer

I think the problem with

if (condition1 && condition2 && ...) 

was simply that it could become hard to read and edit if there are lots of conditions, although you could always write it like this:

if ( condition1 &&
     condition2 &&
     condition3 ... )
    doStuff();

How about you turn the loop into a function:

bool all()
{
    if (!condition1) return false;
    if (!condition2) return false;
    if (!condition3) return false;      
    ....
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Affraid I dont like the function idea, it would be bool all(param1, param2, param3, param4 ...), give you the overhead of a function call and essentially achieve the same result. –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 12:56
    
out of interest, what do your conditions look like? If they are in a convenient format to be passed as parameters, how about a for:each loop? valid = true; for (condition in conditions) { if (!condition) {valid = false; break;}} if (valid) doStuff(); –  Jan Dec 14 '10 at 13:06
1  
@aronp: "overhead of a function call"? Not really. The compiler can inline the call if it is a problem, but most likely it isn't. And it doesn't achieve "essentially the same result". It gives you readable and reusable code. The all() function can be called again the next time you need to check the same conditions. The original pseudo-loop would have to be copy-pasted. But most importantly, it results in code that the reader can make sense of. –  jalf Dec 14 '10 at 13:27
1  
@aronp: oh dear.. no, forget the for:each loop. It would have been cool if it was basically the same value being compared to different other values. If you're worried about function call overhead, you might want to cache the return value of WifiInfo.getDetailedStateOf(ss) instead of calling it twice. –  Jan Dec 14 '10 at 13:37
3  
The "conditions" have side effects... it looks more and more as a good candidate to extract into a helper function. The number of actual code lines is not negligible and the flow is not trivial, keeping it in the same function with the weird construct will make it even harder to read, and to interpret what the overall function is doing... On the other hand, a function with a couple of fall through returns is something most people is familiar with, and if the function name is appropriate you will not even have to dwell into the gory details of the conditions... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 14 '10 at 14:19

Here's sort of compromise, if you want to keep the indentation as it is:

boolean valid = true;  // optimistic start

if (!valid || !condition1)
   valid = false;

if (!valid || !condition2)
   valid = false;

if (!valid || !condition3)
   valid = false;

if (valid)
   doSomething();

The !valid in the first if statement is superflucious but doesn't harm, could be kept for readability. else/if is more elegant, to my opinion, but that's just an opinion.

But I really wouldn't (ab-)use the for loop and I never ever would find a cheap way to implement a pseudo-goto. There's always a better solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Adreas, I am affraid I dont really like it because it depends on the order of evaluation of conditions in if statements (condition2 could be checked even though condition1 has failed IF the order of evaluation was different, I know it isnt but dont like relying on that) –  aronp Dec 14 '10 at 14:00
    
@aronp If you're planning to port this to a variety of languages then you may have a valid concern. In C++ (and C) relying on the order of evaluation can actually make your code clearer since it's been that way for decades. –  Mark B Dec 14 '10 at 14:49

I'm not sure why you need a loop if there is a break statement at the end of the loop. Arent you just iterating once, no matter the situation?

Anyway, you'll usually find two differing opinions concerning this on SO, one being that break statements shouldn't be used at all, and one being that it depends on the situation.

I tend to fall in with the latter group, but the way that your loop works uses superfluous break statements. I'd much rather structure such a loop like this:

bool valid = true;

for(... ; .... && valid == true ; ....)
{
     if (!condition1)
        valid = false;

     if (!condition2)
        valid = false;

     if (!condition3)
        valid = false;

}

This allows a loop exit that I think is more elegant.

share|improve this answer
    
the first paragraph here shows exactly why the OPs code is bad. ;) –  jalf Dec 14 '10 at 19:12

Having such a long if statement is most likely bad coding.
It makes it very hard to test, and is most likely a code smell.

If possible you should refactor to take advantage of polymorphism.

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How about relocating the setup to the operator bool on the Condition class? This makes it far more readable and hides the mechanics.

class Condition
{
    bool _isSet;
public:
    Condition() : _isSet(false) {
    }
    void setup() {
        _isSet = true;
    }
    operator bool () {
        if (!_isSet) {
            setup();
        }
        return rand() & 1;
    }
};

void doSomething()
{
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Condition cond1, cond2, cond3;
    if (cond1 && cond2 && cond3) {
        doSomething();
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Whoops this is C++, wrong language - so sorry! –  Michael Smith Dec 14 '10 at 15:34

You can take that code out to a separate function and use multiple return statements. You will likely need to refactor the long list of if statements into a separate function anyway.

bool isValid()
{
    if (!condition1)
        return false;

    condition2.setup();

    if (!condition2)
        return false;

    condition3.setup();

    if (!condition3)
        return false;

    return true;
}

Then you could use it in your code:

if (isValid()) dosomething();
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