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Suppose I have two boost python modules that are defined as follows. Module A:

class SomeClass {
public:
    SomeClass() {}
    ~SomeClass() {}
};
BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(A)
{   
    class_<SomeClass>("SomeClass");
}

And module B:

class AnotherClass {
public:
    AnotherClass() {}
    ~AnotherClass() {}
    void func(SomeClass& sp) {}
};
BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(B)
{   class_<AnotherClass>("AnotherClass")
        .def("func", &AnotherClass::func)
    ;
}

Module B has a dependency on module A (i.e. it uses SomeClass from module A). Now, I execute the following python script:

import A
import B
obj1 = A.SomeClass()
obj2 = B.AnotherClass()
obj2.func(obj1)

I get the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\bladiebla\script.py", line 8, in <module>
    obj2.func(obj1)
ArgumentError: Python argument types in
AnotherClass.func(AnotherClass, SomeClass)
did not match C++ signature:
func(class AnotherClass {lvalue}, class SomeClass)

It seems that Python does not automatically translate classes between modules. Does anyone have an idea how to solve this?

share|improve this question

I just recently started fiddling with Boost.Python and had the same problem.

Check out section 6 of the following doc:

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/libs/python/doc/building.html

6.1 - The Dynamic Binary

The library contains a type conversion registry. Because one registry is shared among all extension modules, instances of a class exposed to Python in one dynamically-loaded extension module can be passed to functions exposed in another such module.

I was using the static binary and got the same type of error you were getting. Once I changed to the dynamic binary, it compiled and ran fine.

share|improve this answer

Based on your latest response and updated error message in your question, I think the problem might be because your BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE usage might be incorrect (based on what I've seen in other examples of using it). Try something like this and see if it helps:

Module A:

class SomeClass {
public:
    SomeClass() {}
    ~SomeClass() {}
};
BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(A)
{   
    boost::python::class_<SomeClass>("SomeClass");
}

And module B:

class AnotherClass {
public:
    AnotherClass() {}
    ~AnotherClass() {}
    void func(SomeClass& sp) {}
};
BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(B)
{   boost::python::class_<AnotherClass>("AnotherClass")
        .def("func", &AnotherClass::func)
    ;
}

Note the insertion of a "boost::python::" prefix onto the class_<...> statement in each of the two BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE declarations.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you very much for your feedback. However, I would like to solve this problem for two classes that do not have an inheritance relationship. For example, you could imagine that 'SomeClass' is in fact a class 'Triangle' and that 'AnotherClass' is the class 'Polygon'. I definitely do not want Polygon to inherit from Triangle, because it doesn't make sense from an OO point of view. So how can I have two classes in different modules that do not inherit from each other, but that use each other through Python, as in my original example? – Arjan Dec 15 '10 at 11:46
    
func() wants a SomeClass argument. If you want to pass it something different, like AnotherClass, you can do so without making AnotherClass inherit from SomeClass by adding a constructor to SomeClass that takes an AnotherClass as an argument. Alternatively you could just write something that accepted an AnotherClass argument and returned a SomeClass instance, but would have to call it explicitly. If you can't do something like that then I think you're stuck -- what's func() supposed to do anyway, if passed some arbitrary class it knows nothing about? – martineau Dec 15 '10 at 13:02
    
Yes, I understand that, but I do not want to pass anything different to this function, only an argument of type SomeClass. In the python script example, my obj1 is of type A.SomeClass. It is unrelated to B.AnotherClass. 'func' in B.AnotherClass should accept parameters of type A.SomeClass, such as obj1. – Arjan Dec 15 '10 at 13:51
    
If func() accepts AnotherClass arguments, change its declaration inside class AnotherClass in Module B to void func(AnotherClass& sp) -- that is its "C++ signature". Afterwards the obj2.func(obj1) call should be OK. – martineau Dec 15 '10 at 15:31
    
P.S, The only reason you can get away with changing func()'s signature like I suggested is because it doesn't do anything with it's argument since its defined (inline) to be an empty function, {}, in your sample code. If it accessed its argument and tried to do something with it, the change would likely would not work unless the code can really handle an object of type AnotherCLass. – martineau Dec 15 '10 at 15:44

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