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Why can't enum's constructor access static fields and methods? This is perfectly valid with a class, but is not allowed with an enum.

What I'm trying to do is store my enum instances in a static Map. Consider this example code which allows lookup by abbreivation:

public enum Day {
    Sunday("Sun"), Monday("Mon"), Tuesday("Tue"), Wednesday("Wed"), Thursday("Thu"), Friday("Fri"), Saturday("Sat");

    private final String abbreviation;

    private static final Map<String, Day> ABBREV_MAP = new HashMap<String, Day>();

    private Day(String abbreviation) {
        this.abbreviation = abbreviation;
        ABBREV_MAP.put(abbreviation, this);  // Not valid
    }

    public String getAbbreviation() {
        return abbreviation;
    }

    public static Day getByAbbreviation(String abbreviation) {
        return ABBREV_MAP.get(abbreviation);
    }
}

This will not work as enum doesn't allow static references in its constructor. It however works just find if implemented as a class:

public static final Day SUNDAY = new Day("Sunday", "Sun");
private Day(String name, String abbreviation) {
    this.name = name;
    this.abbreviation = abbreviation;
    ABBREV_MAP.put(abbreviation, this);  // Valid
}
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2 Answers

up vote 35 down vote accepted

The constructor is called before the static fields have all been initialized, because the static fields (including those representing the enum values) are initialized in textual order, and the enum values always come before the other fields. Note that in your class example you haven't shown where ABBREV_MAP is initialized - if it's after SUNDAY, you'll get an exception when the class is initialized.

Yes, it's a bit of a pain and could probably have been designed better.

However, the usual answer in my experience is to have a static {} block at the end of all the static initializers, and do all static initialization there, using EnumSet.allOf to get at all the values.

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12  
If you add a nested class, then the statics of that will be initialised at an appropriate time. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 14 '09 at 18:53
    
Ooh, nice one. I hadn't thought of that. –  Jon Skeet Jan 14 '09 at 19:48
    
I don't really understand the statement about the static initializer block. I tried creating a static initializer block in an enum class, and it was being called after the constructor of the enum member, apparently done according to textual order as you said. –  Hosam Aly Feb 11 '09 at 21:16
    
If you try to use a static variable within the enum constructor (as in the question) you'll see the uninitialized value. Instead, use a static initializer to initialize everything after the enum values have all been constructed and the rest of the static variables are initialized. –  Jon Skeet Feb 11 '09 at 22:01
2  
Bit of an odd one but if you call a static method in an enum constructor which returns a static value it will compile fine - but the value it returns will be the default one for that type (i.e. 0, 0.0, '\u0000' or null), even if you explicitly set it (unless it's declared as final). Guess that'll be a difficult one to catch! –  Mark Rhodes Jul 7 '11 at 14:58
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Below lines are from Java LangSpec 3.0 PDF, Page No: 252

Without this rule, apparently reasonable code would fail at run time due to the initialization circularity inherent in enum types. (A circularity exists in any class with a "self-typed" static field.) Here is an example of the sort of code that would fail:

 enum Color {
     RED, GREEN, BLUE;
     static final Map<String,Color> colorMap = new HashMap<String,Color>();

    Color() {
       colorMap.put(toString(), this);
    }
  }

Static initialization of this enum type would throw a NullPointerException because the static variable colorMap is uninitialized when the constructors for the enum constants run. The restriction above ensures that such code won’t compile.

Note that the example can easily be refactored to work properly:

 enum Color {
     RED, GREEN, BLUE;
     static final Map<String,Color> colorMap = new HashMap<String,Color>();

    static {
      for (Color c : Color.values())
            colorMap.put(c.toString(), c);
    }
  }

The refactored version is clearly correct, as static initialization occurs top to bottom.

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