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I'm trying to migrate some managed c++ code to 64bits. I have a function that gets varargs, and when I pass a System::String variable to it, it appears not to pass correctly. Here is a simplification of the code that shows the problem:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdarg.h>
    void test(char* formatPtr, ...)
        va_list args;
        int bufSize;
        char buffer[2600];

        //parse arguments from function stack
        va_start(args, formatPtr);

        bufSize = vsprintf(buffer, (const char*) formatPtr, args);


    void main() {
        System::String^ s;
        s = "Shahar";
        test("Hello %s", s);

When this code runs in 32 bits, it displays Hello Shahar.

When it runs in 64 bits, it displays Hello Çz∟⌠■.

Assuming I want to make the least amount of changes to the code, how should I fix this?

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2 Answers 2

The %s specifier expects a C-style null-terminated string, not a System::String^. C++/CLI headers provide some methods that can convert System::String^ to std::string, which can be converted to a C-string, and can probably just convert straight to a C-string.

You have other problems too. void main()? Assigning a literal to a char*? Fixed-size buffer?

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The %s specifier accepts System::String^ just fine. If I don't go through varargs, this works perfectly. This is just a simplification of the code, to show the problem. I'm not interested in making this code nice. I want it to work, so I can take the solution to the 'real' code. – Shahar Dec 14 '10 at 14:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It looks as though the problem is in the mix between managed code and varargs. It appears that they are not compatible with each other.

I don't know why this works in 32-bits, but it looks like the wrong thing to do.

I changed the code, so as to be only managed code, with no varargs.

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