Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have programmatic access to a POP3 mailbox plus access to archived emails stored in a database. My objective to to find out bad email addresses -- the email addresses from which emails were returned (bounced) with status or messages such as:

  • Undeliverable mail
  • Delivery Status Notification (Failure)
  • Undelivered mail returned to sender
  • Emails from people such as mailer-daemon or postmaster

Is there are way to filter out such emails without using "heuristics"? Its easy to scan the subject for words like "undeliverable" or senders such as "mailer-daemon" but I want a better solution, if any.

Note that I have access to mail headers for all POP3/database archived emails. Is there some header that I can use?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Some mail servers implement RFC 3464. Those that do will typically generate Delivery Status Notifications with a message header Content-Type of multipart/report and three component parts (text/plain, message/delivery-status and message/rfc822). So you could detect those characteristics of the message and process accordingly. The message will generally look like this:

From: "Mail Delivery System" <MAILER-DAEMON@example.com>
Subject: Delivery Status Notification (Failure)
Content-Type: multipart/report; report-type=delivery-status

Content-Type: text/plain
A human readable explanation of the Delivery Status Notification.

Content-Type: message/delivery-status
A structured machine readable reason for the Delivery Status Notification.

Content-Type: message/rfc822
The original message.

For those mail servers that generate Delivery Status Notifications in an unstructured format, it is probably still necessary to detect their notifications by analysing the text of the From: and Subject: message headers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.