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I know you can do

print str(myList)

to get

[1, 2, 3]

and you can do

i = 0
for entry in myList:
  print str(i) + ":", entry
  i += 1

to get

0: 1  
1: 2  
2: 3    

But is there a way similar to the first to get a result similar to the last?

With my limited knowledge of Python (and some help from the documentation), my best is:

print '\n'.join([str(n) + ": " + str(entry) for (n, entry) in zip(range(0,len(myList)), myList)])

It's not much less verbose, but at least I get a custom string in one (compound) statement. Can you do better?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted
>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> print('\n'.join('{}: {}'.format(*k) for k in enumerate(lst)))
0: 1
1: 2
2: 3

Note: you just need to understand that list comprehension or iterating over a generator expression is explicit looping.

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+1 for that; I know python pretty well and that's just pretty, simple, and clean –  Andrew White Dec 14 '10 at 15:11
1  
More explicitly: Losing the square brackets makes it a generator expression, so it doesn't create the whole list in memory before building a string from it. And enumerate is a built in function to do the same as the poster's zip/range/len combo. –  Thomas K Dec 14 '10 at 15:11
    
+1 i like format and enumerate use ;) –  Ant Dec 14 '10 at 15:12
    
It's snippets like these that remember me how great Python is. +1 –  delnan Dec 14 '10 at 15:12
    
I thought I'd might be still missing something. I probably need the documentation before actually using this. But this is the "elegance" I was looking for. –  stefaanv Dec 14 '10 at 15:17
l = [1, 2, 3]
print '\n'.join(['%i: %s' % (n, l[n]) for n in xrange(len(l))])
share|improve this answer
3  
I'm shocked how many people seemingly don't know enumerate. –  delnan Dec 14 '10 at 15:11
    
@delnan: I don't know it either, probably because I don't use python enough (tests and scripting). I'll look into it now. –  stefaanv Dec 14 '10 at 15:15
    
Yes indeed, useful knowledge :) I upvoted the other one ;) –  Lucas Moeskops Dec 14 '10 at 15:16

Another:

>>> lst=[10,11,12]
>>> fmt="%i: %i"
>>> for d in enumerate(lst):
...    print(fmt%d)
... 
0: 10
1: 11
2: 12

Yet another form:

>>> for i,j in enumerate(lst): print "%i: %i"%(i,j)

That method is nice since the individual elements in tuples produced by enumerate can be modified such as:

>>> for i,j in enumerate([3,4,5],1): print "%i^%i: %i "%(i,j,i**j)
... 
1^3: 1 
2^4: 16 
3^5: 243 

Of course, don't forget you can get a slice from this like so:

>>> for i,j in list(enumerate(lst))[1:2]: print "%i: %i"%(i,j)
... 
1: 11
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There is nothing wrong with explicit looping. I was just wondering what the alternatives were. –  stefaanv Dec 15 '10 at 8:13
from time import clock
from random import sample

n = 500
myList = sample(xrange(10000),n)
#print myList

A,B,C,D = [],[],[],[]

for i in xrange(100):
    t0 = clock()
    ecr =( '\n'.join('{}: {}'.format(*k) for k in enumerate(myList)) )
    A.append(clock()-t0)

    t0 = clock()
    ecr = '\n'.join(str(n) + ": " + str(entry) for (n, entry) in zip(range(0,len(myList)), myList))
    B.append(clock()-t0)

    t0 = clock()
    ecr = '\n'.join(map(lambda x: '%s: %s' % x, enumerate(myList)))
    C.append(clock()-t0)

    t0 = clock()
    ecr = '\n'.join('%s: %s' % x for x in enumerate(myList))
    D.append(clock()-t0)

print '\n'.join(('t1 = '+str(min(A))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(A)/min(D)),
                 't2 = '+str(min(B))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(B)/min(D)),
                 't3 = '+str(min(C))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(C)/min(D)),
                 't4 = '+str(min(D))+'   '+'{:.1%}.'.format(min(D)/min(D))))

For n=500:

150.8%.
142.7%.
110.8%.
100.0%.

For n=5000:

153.5%.
176.2%.
109.7%.
100.0%.

Oh, I see now: only the solution 3 with map() fits with the title of the question.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice research. Generator expression isn't explicit looping, so they all count with 1 and 4 being my favorites, with 1 using a more powerful, but as here show, slower formatting. Merci. –  stefaanv Dec 15 '10 at 8:11
    
timeit –  SilentGhost Dec 15 '10 at 16:22

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