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I'd like to test the validity of a regular expression in PHP, preferably before it's used. Is the only way to do this actually trying a preg_match() and seeing if it returns FALSE?

Is there a simpler/proper way to test for a valid regular expression?

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6  
Do you mean something like: stackoverflow.com/questions/172303/… ? –  Jon Oct 16 '12 at 23:10
    
If it doesn't have to be in code, you can go to regexr.com, and paste in your regex, and type in the text you're matching it up against. –  Kao Oct 19 '12 at 8:08
    
Why don't you want to check preg_match() against false? –  rubo77 Oct 19 '12 at 18:31
1  
Looks like i came late for the party –  Baba Oct 20 '12 at 10:56
    
Some answers do not consider that MAYBE the regex to be validated comes from the input of an admin user of an app... MAYBE the app has a "contact_types" table with a "regex" field... –  J. Bruni Mar 1 at 5:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 50 down vote accepted
+250
// This is valid, both opening ( and closing )
var_dump(preg_match('~Valid(Regular)Expression~', null) === false);
// This is invalid, no opening ( for the closing )
var_dump(preg_match('~InvalidRegular)Expression~', null) === false);

As the user pozs said, also consider putting @ in front of preg_match() (@preg_match()) in a testing environment to prevent warnings or notices.

To validate a RegExp just run it against null (no need to know the data you want to test against upfront). If it returns explicit false (=== false), it's broken. Otherwise it's valid though it need not match anything.

So there's no need to write your own RegExp validator. It's wasted time...

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Just a guess: The OP said "I'd like to test the validity of a regular expression in PHP, preferably before it's used." –  JDB Oct 18 '12 at 14:17
4  
@Cyborgx37 So what? I gave him the solution with a NULL. You don't need to now the string you'll use it against. You just need to know the pattern to see if it's correct. If it'll match or not... that's a different story and depends on your target string. What did I say wrong? –  CodeAngry Oct 18 '12 at 15:09
1  
I didn't downvote you... just guessing why someone might have. I think your answer is fine. –  JDB Oct 18 '12 at 16:02
3  
Note, that in the case of an invalid regexp, your code will show up a warning, which is too bad for only testing the expression - you should protect you preg_match() call with @ –  pozs Oct 23 '12 at 11:31
    
The error suppression operator isn't a good solution because of issues with unit testing frameowrks and other disabling the "@" operator for testing. As workaround you can use "set_error_handler" before and "restore_error_handler" after that test ;) –  mabe.berlin Oct 23 '12 at 15:33

I created a simple function that can be called to checking preg

function is_preg_error()
{
    $errors = array(
        PREG_NO_ERROR               => 'Code 0 : No errors',
        PREG_INTERNAL_ERROR         => 'Code 1 : There was an internal PCRE error',
        PREG_BACKTRACK_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 2 : Backtrack limit was exhausted',
        PREG_RECURSION_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 3 : Recursion limit was exhausted',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_ERROR         => 'Code 4 : The offset didn\'t correspond to the begin of a valid UTF-8 code point',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_OFFSET_ERROR  => 'Code 5 : Malformed UTF-8 data',
    );

    return $errors[preg_last_error()];
}

You can call this function using the follow code :

preg_match('/(?:\D+|<\d+>)*[!?]/', 'foobar foobar foobar');
echo is_preg_error();

Alternative - Regular Expression Online Tester

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2  
This is just a wrapper around preg_last_error specific for the English language. –  Alin Purcaru Oct 22 '12 at 20:39
    
By the way, this will not really tell you if regex is valid or not. Consider this: php > preg_match("/aaa",""); php > echo preg_last_error(); 0 –  Alex N. Oct 6 '13 at 5:41

If you want to dynamically test a regex preg_match(...) === false seems to be your only option. PHP doesn't have a mechanism for compiling regular expressions before they are used.

Also you may find preg_last_error an useful function.

On the other hand if you have a regex and just want to know if it's valid before using it there are a bunch of tools available out there. I found rubular.com to be pleasant to use.

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Without actually executing the regex you have no way to be sure if it's be valid. I've recently implemented a similar RegexValidator for Zend Framework. Works just fine.

<?php
class Nuke_Validate_RegEx extends Zend_Validate_Abstract
{
    /**
     * Error constant
     */
    const ERROR_INVALID_REGEX = 'invalidRegex';

    /**
     * Error messages
     * @var array
     */
    protected $_messageTemplates = array(
        self::ERROR_INVALID_REGEX => "This is a regular expression PHP cannot parse.");

    /**
     * Runs the actual validation
     * @param string $pattern The regular expression we are testing
     * @return bool
     */
    public function isValid($pattern)
    {
        if (@preg_match($pattern, "Lorem ipsum") === false) {
            $this->_error(self::ERROR_INVALID_REGEX);
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}
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You can check to see if it is a syntactically correct regex with this nightmare of a regex, if your engine supports recursion (PHP should).

You cannot, however algorithmically tell if it will give the results you want without running it.

From: Is there a regular expression to detect a valid regular expression?

/^((?:(?:[^?+*{}()[\]\\|]+|\\.|\[(?:\^?\\.|\^[^\\]|[^\\^])(?:[^\]\\]+|\\.)*\]|\((?:\?[:=!]|\?<[=!]|\?>)?(?1)??\)|\(\?(?:R|[+-]?\d+)\))(?:(?:[?+*]|\{\d+(?:,\d*)?\})[?+]?)?|\|)*)$/
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OH MY GOD, you are validating RegEx with RegEx? Teach me more, God! –  WaffleStealer654 Aug 15 at 3:34

You can validate your regular expression with a regular expression and up to a certain limit. Checkout this stack overflow answer for more info.

Note: a "recursive regular expression" is not a regular expression, and this extended version of regex doesn't match extended regexes.

A better option is to use preg_match and match against NULL as @Claudrian said

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So in summary, for all those coming to this question you can validate regular expressions in PHP with a function like this.

preg_match() returns 1 if the pattern matches given subject, 0 if it does not, or FALSE if an error occurred. - PHP Manual

/**
 * Return an error message if the regular expression is invalid
 *
 * @param string $regex string to validate
 * @return string
 */
function invalidRegex($regex)
{
    if(preg_match($regex, null) !== false)
    {
        return '';
    }

    $errors = array(
        PREG_NO_ERROR               => 'Code 0 : No errors',
        PREG_INTERNAL_ERROR         => 'Code 1 : There was an internal PCRE error',
        PREG_BACKTRACK_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 2 : Backtrack limit was exhausted',
        PREG_RECURSION_LIMIT_ERROR  => 'Code 3 : Recursion limit was exhausted',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_ERROR         => 'Code 4 : The offset didn\'t correspond to the begin of a valid UTF-8 code point',
        PREG_BAD_UTF8_OFFSET_ERROR  => 'Code 5 : Malformed UTF-8 data',
    );

    return $errors[preg_last_error()];
}

Which can be used like this.

if($error = invalidRegex('/foo//'))
{
    die($error);
}
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I am not sure if it supports PCRE, but there is a Chrome extension over at https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/cmmblmkfaijaadfjapjddbeaoffeccib called RegExp Tester. I have not used it as yet myself so I cannot vouch for it, but perhaps it could be of use?

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I'd be inclined to set up a number of unit tests for your regex. This way not only would you be able to ensure that the regex is indeed valid but also effective at matching.

I find using TDD is an effective way to develop regex and means that extending it in the future is simplified as you already have all of your test cases available.

The answer to this question has a great answer on setting up your unit tests.

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Thanks Rob. I'm a fan of TDD, but the code in question needs to be able to validate regex as an input (I'm validating JSON schemas, that can contain regex patterns). –  rossmcf May 13 at 8:39

According to the PCRE reference, there is no such way to test validity of an expression, before it's used. But i think, if someone use an invalid expression, it's a design error in that application, not a run-time one, so you should be fine.

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-1 as the OP's question was not before it's used but before it's used against real data. One thing is testing with 5MB of scraped data and another with an empty string that just verifies that the RegExp compiles. SO: In PHP you can test it, in C++ you can test it. In C++11 you get an exception thrown if it's invalid, in PHP you get the explicit false. Any RegExp is compiled before it's executed and that's where the errors occur as its compilation fails when it's illegal regardless if the data you'll use it against. Sheesh... –  CodeAngry Oct 23 '12 at 17:00
    
@Claudrian: i agree, but the question was not before it's used against real data, but preferably before it's used - and there is no such way (as an explicit / dedicated function). But i agree, if one really want to test it, it should be tested against null / empty value. –  pozs Oct 23 '12 at 17:10

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