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(self,left outer,right outer,full outer) join - real world examples

Hello, dear SO community!

I've been working with SQL databases for some time now but one aspect is still very confusing for me - table joins. I understand very clearly what happens when I write a multi-table query, but when a JOIN comes into play, I feel like I just don't understand anything.

Please help me to understand what is table join, and what is the difference between LEFT, RIGHT, INNER and OUTER JOINs? What is a self join?

I would be grateful if you could provide an example of their usage in this simple table structure:

Table authors

id   |name
---------------
1    |John
2    |Bob
3    |Richard

Table books

id   |author_id  |title      |rating
-----------------------------------------
1    |1          |book A     |5
2    |1          |book B     |4.8
3    |3          |book C     |3

Thank you!

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marked as duplicate by Andy, Matt Ball, Abe Miessler, Joe Stefanelli, marc_s Dec 14 '10 at 15:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I googled that exact question and come up with several hits on the front page illustrating the differences. Might have been faster than asking here. To be honest though, I usually have to refresh my memory when I go to do joins myself! –  DarinH Dec 14 '10 at 15:26
1  
" I understand very clearly, what happens, when I write a multitable query, but when a JOIN comes into play, I feel like I just don't understand anything." HUh? a join is alwys in play when writing multitable queries, you aren't using the implicit join syntax are you (the one with the commas between tables)? If so, do not ever write another piece of code using that ourtdated and very poor syntax. If you use that poor syntax it is no wonder you don't understand joins. –  HLGEM Dec 14 '10 at 15:33
    
HLGEM, why is it outdated and poor? –  Silver Light Dec 14 '10 at 15:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

See A Visual Explanation of SQL Joins

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1  
+1 excellent page, excellent explanation –  marc_s Dec 14 '10 at 15:25

Inner Join:

SELECT
    a.*,
    b.*
FROM
    authors a
    INNER JOIN books b ON
        a.id = b.author_id

Will result in this:

id   |name     |id   |author_id  |title      |rating
---------------------------------------------------------
1    |John     |1    |1          |book A     |5
1    |John     |1    |1          |book B     |4.8
3    |Richard  |3    |3          |book C     |3

Notice that Bob was not shown - a inner join always removes items that are not present in both sources (considering the join criteria; in our case a.id = b.author_id.

Left Join:

SELECT
    a.*,
    b.*
FROM
    authors a
    LEFT JOIN books b ON
        a.id = b.author_id

Will result in this:

id   |name     |id   |author_id  |title      |rating
---------------------------------------------------------
1    |John     |1    |1          |book A     |5
1    |John     |1    |1          |book B     |4.8
2    |Bob      |null |null       |null       |null
3    |Richard  |3    |3          |book C     |3

Now all authors are shown - a LEFT JOIN (or LEFT OUTER JOIN, it's the same) will keep all "left" records (authors) and will substitute the "right" records that are not found with null.

About "right joins" - it's the same as "left joins", but with a inverse relation. The following query will result the same records as the last one (notice that the tables are in a inverse order, to compensate the use of right join):

SELECT
    a.*,
    b.*
FROM
    books b
    RIGHT JOIN authors a ON
        a.id = b.author_id

Hope it is clearer now.

PS: there is also FULL OUTER JOIN. Think of a left and a right join combined - if there were books without author they would also be shown when using a full outer join.

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Love it. It just paints the picture so clearly. –  Frank Fu Mar 11 '13 at 3:36

FROM A {join type} B ON {Join Condition}

Inner: Will only show results where the join condition is true. If there is no true condition for a row on A, then it will be removed from the results.

Left: Will not filter out rows from A that do not have a matching join on B

Right: Will filter out rows from A that do not have a matching join on B

Outer: left and right joins are considered outer joins where inner is an inner join.

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