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I'm implementing some classes to handle the common data structures (Tree, BinaryTree, Search Binary Tree, BTree, AVL, etc). I'd like a way to store tree information in a data source and parse it to one of those classes. The simplest way is to use XML (portability is very important). The thing is that the XML documents that i make are not easy to read. They're not enough "intuitive". For example, i was doing something like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<tree>
    <root>100</root>
    <node>
        <tree>
            <root>50</root>     
        </tree>
    </node>
    <node>
        <tree>
            <root>200</root>        
        </tree>
    </node>
</tree>

There, the tree would be something like this:

                    100
              50                200

What do you say? Do you have any other recommendation?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't see in your description any important structural difference between the root, leaves of the tree, and other nodes. So they could all have the same content model, as in this example:

<tree>
    <value>100</value>
    <tree>
        <value>50</value>
    </tree>
    <tree>
        <value>200</value>
    </tree>
</tree>

This structure is a bit less verbose, and the XML document tree is matching the tree you are trying to represent. If your values can be expressed as strings, you could even write it like that:

<tree>
    100
    <tree>50</tree>
    <tree>200</tree>
</tree>
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There is no 'best' way to represent a tree in XML. It all depends what you want to optimize your storage for - do you want to be able to track down a specific node quickly? Then a flat(er) representation might be better. If you want to keep the description non-verbose, then the method you outlined will be pretty good (though I would probably turn the 'root' child into an attribute (root/value), that way every node in the xml is actually a tree node).

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You say recursive? –  santiagobasulto Dec 14 '10 at 15:38
    
@santiagobasulto, it doesn't have to be recursive - your representation is recursive (and the only thing I would change with it is getting rid of the 'root' node and only using 'tree' nodes, ie: <tree root="100"><tree root="50"/><tree root="200"/></tree> would represent your entire tree that way. But the point I was trying to make was that there are lots of other legitimate ways of storing the data, it all depends on what you want to do with it and what you want to optimize it for. –  Assaf Dec 14 '10 at 15:52
<node value="100">
    <node value="50" />
    <node value="200" />
</node>

Elements in the tree are nodes, not trees. The whole node assembly constitues a tree.

Also, XML is a tree itself, so you don't have to explicitly model it.

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In my opinion, data structures are meant to be easy on the computer, not a human. If you want a human readable version of the data, just create a pretty printing visitor.

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