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In Javascript The Good Parts, it states:

alt text

So I would expect the following code example to output 1001 since "objects are never copied but passed around by reference", so why does it output 0000?

var page_item = {
  id_code : 'welcome',
  title : 'Welcome',
  access_groups : {
      developer : '0010',
      administrator : '0100'
  }
};
page_item.access_groups.member = '0000';
var member = page_item.access_groups.member;
member = '1001';

$('p#test').html(page_item.access_groups.member); //should be "1001" but is "0000"

Added:

@Gareth @David, thanks, this is what I was trying to show in this example, works:

var page_item = {
  id_code : 'welcome',
  title : 'Welcome',
  access_groups : {
      developer : '0010',
      administrator : '0100'
  }
};
var page_item2 = page_item;
page_item2.access_groups.developer = '1001';

$('p#test').html(page_item.access_groups.developer); //is '1001'
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This is the same in Python, and easily explained there (x.y = ... is a method call on x's __dict__, x = ... is not a method call). @Potential answerers: Is there a similar reasoning in JS? –  delnan Dec 14 '10 at 15:49
    
@delnan - x.y = is not a method call in Javascript. (Well, it is possible in ECMAScript to define setter and getter methods for object properties but that's not the paradigm which caused the confusion in this question) –  Gareth Dec 14 '10 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't think of pass-by-reference in the C++ context, because it's not the same.

var member = page_item.access_groups.member // Sets member to this value
member = '1001'; // Now sets it to another value

If there was a method on strings which changed them, then this:

member.removeLastLetter();

would alter page_item.access_groups.member. However, with your = you are changing the variable's reference, not the object it previously referenced

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I was thinking about whether this is actually correct or not, and a key thing to note is that String is an object too. After I realized that, it made more sense to me. –  Sam Apr 21 '11 at 5:46

Because page_item.access_groups.member is a string and not an Object.

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Even if page_item.access_groups.member = {}, a following line var member = page_item.access_groups.member; member = {foo:1001} wouldn't update the page_item.access_groups.member object –  Gareth Dec 14 '10 at 15:44

This is probably getting bashed by JS-Gurus but basically it goes down like this:

Objects are passed by reference.
Strings (numbers, etc... basically 1 dimensional variables) are passed by value.

I did try and understand the lengthy explanations on data types but I seriously needed some work done and haven't gotten time to look at it more closely.

share|improve this answer
    
PBR and PBV are basically myths in javascript. The main point is, if you have a reference to anything (string or otherwise) in a variable var x, as soon as you write x = ... you are discarding your initial reference and creating a new one, as opposed to performing the an operation on the value you had previously referenced. –  Gareth Dec 14 '10 at 16:10

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