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It's child's play to do this in Safari, which has good Applescript support. Google Chrome's AS support has just arrived so I'm giving them the benefit of the doubt. I am basically trying to grab the current HTML via the clipboard so I can get information out. We have some nifty commands like this:

tell application "Google Chrome"
 view source of active tab of window 1
 save active tab of window 1
 print active tab of window 1
 reload active tab of window 1
 go back active tab of window 1
 go forward active tab of window 1
 copy selection of active tab of window 1
 paste selection active tab of window 1
end tell

but alas you can't say "set X to source of active tab of window 1". Anyone have any suggestions for me? My current ideas are to load the code I need in the background in Safari (pretty ugly) or try to display source and grab it with UI script, but that's also ugly. Also I keep encountering scripting bugs that keep it from working.

Any help would be appreciated.

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Wait, Chrome has AppleScript support now? When did that happen? Awesome! –  Antal S-Z Dec 14 '10 at 19:56

4 Answers 4

Since google chrome supports Javascript

--Applescript code
tell active tab of window 1
    set sourcehtml to execute javascript
    document.getElementsByTagName('html')[0].innerHTML
end tell
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I'm very excited to learn that Chrome has AppleScript support now. It's unfortunate that it's minimal as yet, but I'm sure (I hope!) it'll get better. Since there's no way to get the source directly, I'd choose the following hackish route:

tell application "Google Chrome"
    view source of active tab of window 1 -- Or whichever tab you want
    delay 3
    repeat while loading of active tab of window 1
        delay 3
    end repeat
    select all of active tab of window 1 -- Must *always* be the active tab
    copy selection of active tab of window 1
    delete tab (active tab index of window 1) of window 1
end tell
delay 1
return the clipboard

Yes, it's hackish, but that's unavoidable, given the current state of the scripting dictionary. The script should be straightforward: open a source tab, wait for it to load, select the contents, copy it, and close the tab. You can play with the delay 3s to see what works best. Note that the first active tab of window 1 is arbitrary, the rest explicitly refer to the source tab. Also, apparently there's no way to close a tab from within Chrome's scripting dictionary (oy vey), so I had to use JavaScript instead. Also, the last delay 1 shouldn't be necessary, but if it wasn't there, my tests would sometimes return the wrong thing, even though the clipboard contents were correct when I pasted them in. I think it's because there was enough text that it took a noticeable amount of time to update the clipboard.

Edit 1: I replaced execute the active tab of window 1 javascript "window.close()" with the delete tab line, as was suggested to me. Unfortunately, delete tab active tab of window 1 doesn't work, so you need this slightly more convoluted construction.

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2  
you can use delete tab 3. The problem is the multi-process architecture, the HTML is in the renderer wheras the AppleScript code is run in browser process. –  shreyasva Dec 15 '10 at 6:01
    
@user265260: Ooh, nice. Thanks! I'll edit that into my answer. Also, just out of curiosity, why is that feature of Chrome the one causing problems? (If you know the answer.) –  Antal S-Z Dec 16 '10 at 0:31
1  
tell tab (active tab index of window 1) of window 1 to delete should do it. The thing is active tab returns an object of type tab, close is not supported in tab as it has no way of knowing which window it belongs to(this is the correct way as tabs can change their windows). –  shreyasva Dec 16 '10 at 2:56
    
Short Answer: As i said the HTML lives in renderer, one possible way is to tunnel the string using IPC but there are other problems that come up as a result of that. –  shreyasva Dec 16 '10 at 3:00
-- This script copies the HTML of a tab to a TextEdit document.
tell application "Chromium"
 tell tab 1 of window 1 to view source
 repeat while (loading of tab 2 of window 1)
 end repeat
 tell tab 2 of window 1 to select all
 tell tab 2 of window 1 to copy selection
end tell

tell application "TextEdit"
 set text of document 1 to the clipboard
end tell

Explanation: The script is put in a tight loop waiting for the tab to load, Then just copies the HTML to clipboard.

tell application "Google Chrome"
    set t to active tab index of window 1
    tell active tab of window 1 to view source
    set t to t + 1
    repeat while (loading of tab t of window 1)
    end repeat
    tell tab t of window 1 to select all
    tell tab t of window 1 to copy selection
    delete tab t of window 1
end tell

EDIT1: the above script should do exaclt what you want

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Thanks, that's helpful. Still doing some heavy UI scripting, but because there are little bugs (stuff that doesn't work in Google Chrome yet) it is hard. One issue I'm having is, I need to open a tab, get some data from the main page (it's a bit.ly URL), then do close the tab showing the original tab. For something reason with UI scripting it wants to return to a strange place, the end of the tabs I think. How can I say tell tab 154 of window 1 to become active? –  Peter Payne Dec 15 '10 at 14:44
    
tell application "Google Chrome" set active tab index of window 1 to /*whatever you want*/ end tell –  shreyasva Dec 15 '10 at 15:49

Seeing as how Chrome's AS support has "just arrived" it is bound to be "exciting" to use. In trying some of the commands they have available in their dictionary, it looks as though they still have some kinks to work out. Until Google exposes a way in the API to get the source code more easily (and/or works out the related kinks), you'll have to use one of the alternatives you mention in your post.

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(I have a script that hits command ` again and again until the tab in question loops around but it's slow and really inelegant.) –  Peter Payne Dec 15 '10 at 14:45

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