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I'm trying to inflate a string using zlib's deflate, but it's failing, apparently because it doesn't have the right header. I read elsewhere that the C# solution to this problem is:

public static byte[] FlateDecode(byte[] inp, bool strict) {
    MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(inp);
    InflaterInputStream zip = new InflaterInputStream(stream);
    MemoryStream outp = new MemoryStream();
    byte[] b = new byte[strict ? 4092 : 1];
    try {
        int n;
        while ((n = zip.Read(b, 0, b.Length)) > 0) {
            outp.Write(b, 0, n);
        }
        zip.Close();
        outp.Close();
        return outp.ToArray();
    }
    catch {
        if (strict)
            return null;
        return outp.ToArray();
    }
}

But I know nothing about C#. I can surmise that all it's doing is adding a prefix to the string, but what that prefix is, I have no idea. Would someone be able to phrase this function (or even just the header creation and string concatenation) in C++?

The data which I'm trying to inflate is taken from a PDF using zlib deflation.

Thanks a million, Wyatt

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you can format your code by selecting it and hitting the '101010' icon. I did it this time. – Steve Townsend Dec 14 '10 at 17:07
    
Sorry, just an oversight. Teach me to work at four in the morning. – wyatt Dec 14 '10 at 17:08
    
First, try to actually deflate some random data with zlib. If your code can inflate it back, then the problem is with the data you have. Otherwise, post your C++ code so we can look for possible errors together. – Sergey Tachenov Dec 14 '10 at 17:46
    
The code comes straight from the developer - it works fine. The trouble, I believe, is an optional header and possibly footer which the pdf format either adds or elides, but people don't discuss it much in depth. – wyatt Dec 14 '10 at 17:50

I've had better luck using SharpZipLib for zlib interop than with the native .Net Framework classes. This correctly handles streams from C++ (zlib native) and from Java's compression classes without any funny business being needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, and I'll keep it in mind for the future. Unfortunately, I'm not presently using .NET. Do you know of any alternative solution which will work with mingw? – wyatt Dec 14 '10 at 17:13
    
@wyatt - I see that my answer has missed your point. Why don't you post your C++ code that fails and take it from there? You can edit the C++ code into the question. zlib in C++ ought to be a slam dunk, depending on where the stream came from (which information should also be included in the question). – Steve Townsend Dec 14 '10 at 17:17
1  
If you are not using .NET what is the purpose of this question? If your question is C++ code it might help NOT posting C# code and asking a .NET question. – Ramhound Dec 14 '10 at 17:17
    
@Ramhound - I think the problem is with reading a stream using zlib in C++. Suggestion was that the C# logic in the question might fix the problem, but this ought not to be necessary. If it is needed, then a C++ version should be not too hard to work out. – Steve Townsend Dec 14 '10 at 17:19
    
@Steve - I read the question again and the purpose of the question makes sense now. – Ramhound Dec 14 '10 at 17:22

I can't see any prefixes, sorry. Here's what the logic appears to be; sorry this isn't in C++:

MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(inp);
InflaterInputStream zip = new InflaterInputStream(stream);

Create an inflate stream from the data passed

MemoryStream outp = new MemoryStream();

Create a memory buffer stream for output

byte[] b = new byte[strict ? 4092 : 1];
try {
    int n;
    while ((n = zip.Read(b, 0, b.Length)) > 0) {

If you're in strict mode, read up to 4092 bytes - or 1 in non-strict mode - into a byte buffer

        outp.Write(b, 0, n);

Write all the bytes decoded (may be less than the 4092) to the output memory buffer stream

    zip.Close();
    outp.Close();
    return outp.ToArray();

Clean up, and return the output memory buffer stream as an array.

I'm a bit confused, though: why not just cut array b off at n elements and return that rather than go via a MemoryStream? The code also ought really to take care to clean up the memory streams and zip on exception (e.g. using using) since they're all IDisposable but I guess that's not really important since they don't correspond to I/O file handles, only memory structures.

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