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I'm trying to get a "speech bubble" effect similar to the one in Mac OS X when you right click on something in the dock. Here's what I have now:

alt text

I need to get the "triangle" part of the lower portion. Is there any way I can draw something like that and get a border around it? This will be for an iPhone app.

Thanks in advance!

EDIT: Many thanks to Brad Larson, here's what it looks like now: alt text

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5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

I've actually drawn this exact shape before (rounded rectangle with a pointing triangle at the bottom). The Quartz drawing code that I used is as follows:

CGRect currentFrame = self.bounds;

CGContextSetLineJoin(context, kCGLineJoinRound);
CGContextSetLineWidth(context, strokeWidth);
CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor(context, [MyPopupLayer popupBorderColor]); 
CGContextSetFillColorWithColor(context, [MyPopupLayer popupBackgroundColor]);

// Draw and fill the bubble
CGContextBeginPath(context);
CGContextMoveToPoint(context, borderRadius + strokeWidth + 0.5f, strokeWidth + HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + 0.5f);
CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, round(currentFrame.size.width / 2.0f - WIDTHOFPOPUPTRIANGLE / 2.0f) + 0.5f, HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + strokeWidth + 0.5f);
CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, round(currentFrame.size.width / 2.0f) + 0.5f, strokeWidth + 0.5f);
CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, round(currentFrame.size.width / 2.0f + WIDTHOFPOPUPTRIANGLE / 2.0f) + 0.5f, HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + strokeWidth + 0.5f);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, strokeWidth + HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, round(currentFrame.size.width / 2.0f + WIDTHOFPOPUPTRIANGLE / 2.0f) - strokeWidth + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, strokeWidth + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, strokeWidth + 0.5f, HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + strokeWidth + 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, strokeWidth + 0.5f, strokeWidth + HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + strokeWidth + 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextClosePath(context);
CGContextDrawPath(context, kCGPathFillStroke);

// Draw a clipping path for the fill
CGContextBeginPath(context);
CGContextMoveToPoint(context, borderRadius + strokeWidth + 0.5f, round((currentFrame.size.height + HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE) * 0.50f) + 0.5f);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, round((currentFrame.size.height + HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE) * 0.50f) + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, round(currentFrame.size.width / 2.0f + WIDTHOFPOPUPTRIANGLE / 2.0f) - strokeWidth + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, strokeWidth + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.height - strokeWidth - 0.5f, strokeWidth + 0.5f, HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE + strokeWidth + 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextAddArcToPoint(context, strokeWidth + 0.5f, round((currentFrame.size.height + HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE) * 0.50f) + 0.5f, currentFrame.size.width - strokeWidth - 0.5f, round((currentFrame.size.height + HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE) * 0.50f) + 0.5f, borderRadius - strokeWidth);
CGContextClosePath(context);
CGContextClip(context);     

The clipping path at the end can be left out if you're not going to use a gradient or some other more fill that's more complex than a simple color.

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It looks great! I'm sure I'm missing a lot of key information here, as I tried defining some constants for HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE, WIDTHOFPOPUPTRIANGLE, borderRadius, and strokeWidth, but it gives me about 25 errors. One says "Too few arguments to function CGContextMoveToPoint" Any ideas? Did this work for you? –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 21:01
    
@sudo - In my implementation, strokeWidth and borderRadius are instance variables, with HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE and HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE as defined constants. The context of course needs to be drawn from what is used in the NSView, UIView, or CALayer's overridden drawing method. The "Too few arguments" error sounds like there may have been a stray semicolon in your compiler constant definition, or something like that. –  Brad Larson Dec 14 '10 at 21:48
    
@Brad Larson Thanks for the clarification, it was a stray semicolon that was the offender. I've gotten it looking pretty good, but I'd love to have the popup come from the bottom. Is there an easy way of either rotating the view, or flipping around some calculations? Thank you for your help! :) –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 22:21
    
Never mind, I just used theView.transform = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(3.14); –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 22:34
1  
For all who use Brad's code in the future, to achieve the look in my post above I made HEIGHTOFPOPUPTRIANGLE = 20, WIDTHOFPOPUPTRIANGLE = 40, borderRadius = 8, and strokeWidth = 3. I set the view alpha to 0.75. –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 22:51

Perhaps a simpler question is "Is there code that does this for me already", to which the answer is "Yes".

Behold MAAttachedWindow:

alt text

Granted, you may not want the whole "Attached window" behavior, but at least the drawing code is already there. (And Matt Gemmell's code is high quality stuff)

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1  
While Matt's MAAttachedWindow is a great component for the Mac, I believe he's looking for something that also works on the iPhone (based on the tags). –  Brad Larson Dec 14 '10 at 21:51
    
Yep, that looks great, but yes...I was looking for an iPhone way to do this. I'll update my title... –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 22:04
4  
@sudo @Brad true it's for Mac, but the code he's using is easily applicable to iPhone; just swap NSMakePoint with CGPointMake and NSBezierPath for UIBezierPath and you're pretty much done. –  Dave DeLong Dec 14 '10 at 22:10
    
Oh that's convenient, in that case I'll check into it and maybe use it in future projects. Thanks! –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 22:23
    
Good point. Matt's code is probably cleaner and more flexible than mine. –  Brad Larson Dec 15 '10 at 4:17

There are two ways you might be able to accomplish this:

  1. Add a UIImageView with a triangle image in the right place. Make sure the rest of the image is transparent so as not to block your background.
  2. Override the drawRect: method on your UIView to custom-draw the view. You can then add linear path components for your triangle, filling and bordering the path as necessary.

To draw a simple triangle using drawRect:, you might do something like this. This snippet will draw a triangle pointing downwards at the bottom of your view.

// Get the context
CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

// Pick colors
CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor(context, [[UIColor blackColor] CGColor]);
CGContextSetFillColorWithColor(context, [[UIColor redColor] CGColor]);

// Define triangle dimensions
CGFloat baseWidth = 30.0;
CGFloat height = 20.0;

// Define path
CGContextMoveToPoint(context, self.bounds.size.width / 2.0 - baseWidth / 2.0, 
                              self.bounds.size.height - height);
CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, self.bounds.size.width / 2.0 + baseWidth / 2.0, 
                                 self.bounds.size.height - height);
CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, self.bounds.size.width / 2.0, 
                                 self.bounds.size.height);

// Finalize and draw using path
CGContextClosePath(context);
CGContextStrokePath(context);

For more info, see the CGContext reference.

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Sounds like a plan. Could you please elaborate on how to draw, fill, and border the path? I just am new to drawing stuff. –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 17:34
    
Edited answer with an example. –  Tim Dec 14 '10 at 18:18
    
Thank you very much for taking the time to do that for me. –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 18:25
    
Strangely enough, I can't see anything drawn for me. Unusual... –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 18:34
1  
Try changing the last line to CGContextDrawPath(context, kCGPathFillStroke); to fill as well as stroke. –  Anna Dec 14 '10 at 19:11

See the triangle on the pop up menu in the image below, thats drawn with Core Graphics funcs and is completely scalable.

alt text

Done like this to do an equilateral triangle (old-school function names, sorry):

#define triH(v) (v * 0.866)    

func(CGContextRef inContext, CGRect arrowRect, CustomPushButtonData* controlData) {
// Draw the triangle
float   arrowXstart, arrowYstart;
float   arrowXpos, arrowYpos, arrowHpos; 

if (controlData->controlEnabled && controlData->controlActive) {

    CGContextSetRGBFillColor(inContext, 0., 0., 0., 1.);

} else {

    CGContextSetRGBFillColor(inContext, 0., 0., 0., 0.5);

}

arrowHpos = triH(arrowRect.size.height);

// Point C

CGContextBeginPath(inContext);

arrowXstart = arrowXpos = (arrowRect.origin.x + ((float)(arrowRect.size.width / 2.) - (arrowSize / 2.)));

arrowYstart = arrowYpos = (arrowRect.origin.y + (float)((arrowRect.size.height / 2.) - (float)(arrowHpos / 2.)));

CGContextMoveToPoint(inContext, arrowXpos, arrowYpos);

// Point A

arrowXpos += arrowSize;

CGContextAddLineToPoint(inContext, arrowXpos, arrowYpos);

// Point B

arrowYpos += arrowHpos;

arrowXpos -= (float)(arrowSize / 2.0);

CGContextAddLineToPoint(inContext, arrowXpos, arrowYpos);

// Point C
CGContextAddLineToPoint(inContext, arrowXstart, arrowYstart);

CGContextClosePath(inContext);

CGContextFillPath(inContext);

}

Note that the triH(x) func is an optimized formula for calculating the height of an equitlateral triangle e.g. h = 1/2 * sqrt(3) * x . Since 1/2 * sqrt(3) never changes, I optimized it into that define.

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Maybe you're thinking of Cocoa, but the code you provided doesn't work on the iPhone. It gives me many errors. –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 18:50

I would probably make the whole image (including the triangle) in Photoshop, and then display it on the screen at the appropriate time using the:

CGRect myRect = CGRectMake(10.0f, 0.0f, 300.0f, 420.0f);
UIImageView *myImage = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:myRect];
[myImage setImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"ThisIsMyImageName.png"]];
myImage.opaque = YES;
[self.view addSubview:myImage];
[myImage release];
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2  
I'm wanting to avoid images due the flexibility of resolution-independence. –  sudo rm -rf Dec 14 '10 at 17:35

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