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Is is possible to convert following into a simpler more readable linq or lambda expression?

Dictionary<int, int> selectedProgramTierCombo = new Dictionary<int,int>();
foreach (int mainTierID in doc.TierID)
{
    foreach (PriceProgram priceProgram in doc.CommitmentProgram.PricingPrograms)
    {
        foreach (ProgramTier progTier in priceProgram.Tiers)
        {
            if (progTier.TierID == mainTierID )
            {
                selectedProgramTierCombo.Add(priceProgram.ProgramID, progTier.TierID);
            }
        }
    }
}

Essentially doc.TierID is a an array (int[]) of TierIDs that client is currently on. Also the doc object contains a CommitmentProgram object which contains a list of PriceProgram. So, All I am trying to do is get the PriceProgram.ProgramID for each TierID.

The relationship between PriceProgram and TierID is that each PriceProgram has a list of tiers (ProgramTier object) and ProgramTier oject contains the corresponding TierID that we already have.

Let me know if my explaination doesn't make sense and I'll try to elaborate.

Edit

Jon, I am getting The name 'priceProgram' does not exist in the current context error when I try to compile what you have suggested:

Dictionary<int, int> selectedProgramTierCombo = 
    (from mainTierID in doc.TierID 
     from priceProgram in doc.CommitmentProgram.PricingPrograms 
     **join progTier in priceProgram.Tiers on mainTierID equals progTier.TierID**
     select new { priceProgram.ProgramID, progTier.TierID }) 
    .ToDictionary(x => x.ProgramID, x => x.TierID);
share|improve this question
    
Using the generic type 'System.Collections.Generic.List<T>' requires '1' type arguments. –  ja72 Dec 14 '10 at 17:54
    
I've provided updated code based on Jon's initial answer. –  Anthony Pegram Dec 14 '10 at 19:11
    
I've edited my answer to use another from clause instead of the join... although it sounds like you don't need that bit at all, really. –  Jon Skeet Dec 14 '10 at 19:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Absolutely, it's very easy - but I'll have to change the type of your selectedProgramTierCombo variable, as otherwise it won't compile:

EDIT: Oops, given that the tiers depends on priceProgram, you need another nested from clause, I think:

Dictionary<int, int> selectedProgramTierCombo =
    (from mainTierID in doc.TierID
     from priceProgram in doc.CommitmentProgram.PricingPrograms
     from progTier in priceProgram.Tiers
     where mainTierID == progTier.TierID
     select new { priceProgram.ProgramID, progTier.TierID })
    .ToDictionary(x => x.ProgramID, x => x.TierID);

At least, that's what I think you want. If you could clarify what you really want instead of List<int, int> (which isn't valid) we can help further.

To be honest, it's not clear to me why you're using progTier at all - you know that progTier.TierID is the same as mainTierID, and you're not using it apart from that...

share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps he meant (or needs) List<Tuple<int,int>>, assuming x.ProgramID was not a unique identifier for the purposes of this collection? It wouldn't change the answer greatly, however. –  Anthony Pegram Dec 14 '10 at 17:53
    
@Anthony: Possibly. It's hard to tell :( –  Jon Skeet Dec 14 '10 at 17:53
    
I was thinking about approaching this with a join prior to your comment. Somebody mentioned SelectMany(), which I have never used, is this not a viable solution? Also, I don't usually bother with casting, just punch the whole thing into a var, especially if the structures never leaves the function block. This is purely a matter of style, but may be useful to the poster. –  Sprague Dec 14 '10 at 17:58
    
@Eugarps, (a) Jon's code is the query expression syntax version of SelectMany. If he were to rewrite this using fluent syntax, it would involve that method. (b) There's no casting here, he's just being explicit with his declaration rather than using the inference of var, presumably for the express purpose of demonstrating the fact that the OP has an invalid collection type and a correct one is altogether different. –  Anthony Pegram Dec 14 '10 at 18:25
    
Actually Jon, you got it, I meant Dictionary<int, int> not List<int, int>. Also, you are right about progTier vs mainTierID ... they are the same so I do have to use progTier. Thank you so much for helping me out! –  Robert Dec 14 '10 at 18:27

Jon's answer is the right idea, just needs to be rearranged in order to compile. Here are two options.

var dict = (from mainTierID in doc.TierID
            join f in
                (from priceProgram in doc.CommitmentProgram.PricingPrograms
                    from progTier in priceProgram.Tiers
                    select new { priceProgram.ProgramID, progTier.TierID })
                on mainTierID equals f.TierID
            select f).ToDictionary(f => f.ProgramID, f => f.TierID);


var dict2 = (from priceProgram in doc.CommitmentProgram.PricingPrograms
                from progTier in priceProgram.Tiers
                join mainTierID in doc.TierID on progTier.TierID equals mainTierID
                select new { priceProgram.ProgramID, progTier.TierID })
            .ToDictionary(x => x.ProgramID, x => x.TierID);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Anthony. The first variation really helped clarify what is going on within the code =) –  Robert Dec 14 '10 at 21:40

The Single kind of bugs me, but I have to go with what's being asked for.

Dictionary<int, int> selectedProgramTierCombo =
(
  from priceProgram in doc.CommitmentProgram.PricingPrograms
  let tierId =
  (
    from progTier in priceProgram.Tiers
    where doc.TierID.Any(mainTierID => mainTierID == progTier.TierID)
    select progTier.TierID
  ).Single()
  select new
  {
    ProgramID = priceProgram.ProgramID,
    TierID = tierID
  }
).ToDictionary(x => x.ProgramID, x => x.TierID);

This is what I'd be more comfortable with:

ILookup<int, int> selectedProgramTierCombo =
(
  from priceProgram in doc.CommitmentProgram.PricingPrograms
  from progTier in priceProgram.Tiers
  where doc.TierID.Any(mainTierID => mainTierID == progTier.TierID)
  select new
  {
    ProgramID = priceProgram.ProgramID,
    TierID = progTier.TierID
  }
).ToLookup(x => x.ProgramID, x => x.TierID);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you David. Is there a specific reason why you are using ILookup instead of Dictionary? If so, i'd like to know why. –  Robert Dec 14 '10 at 21:31
    
Since there might be more than one item in doc.TierID, and there might be more than one matching tier in priceProgram.Tiers... a given pricing program might have multiple main tiers (at least in a technical sense). ILookup allows me to have multiple values for a key. –  David B Dec 15 '10 at 15:26
    
Make sense. Thank you! –  Robert Dec 15 '10 at 23:39

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