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I'm playing with the latest Entity Framework CTP 5 release and building a simple asp.net MVC blog where I just have two tables: Post and Comments. This is done entirely in POCO, I just need help on the DbContext part, where I need it to be unit testable (using IDbSet?) and I need a simple/generic repository pattern for add, update, delete, retrieval. Any help is appreciated.

Thanks.

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1  
Is it a good first step? romiller.com/2010/09/07/… –  Devart Dec 15 '10 at 13:22
    
I like that Devart, but it kinda moves away from the Generic Repository Pattern, I'd like to see a repository that takes a single type. Maybe based off DBSet<T> instead? –  mxmissile Dec 15 '10 at 15:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Start with you DbContext, create a new file called Database.cs:

Database.cs

public class Database : DbContext
    {

        private IDbSet<Post> _posts;

        public IDbSet<Post> Posts {
            get { return _posts ?? (_posts = DbSet<Post>()); }
        }

        public virtual IDbSet<T> DbSet<T>() where T : class {
            return Set<T>();
        }
        public virtual void Commit() {
            base.SaveChanges();
        }
}

Define a IDatabaseFactory and implement it with DatabaseFactory:

IDatabaseFactory.cs

public interface IDatabaseFactory : IDisposable
    {
        Database Get();
    }

DatabaseFactory.cs

public class DatabaseFactory : Disposable, IDatabaseFactory {
        private Database _database;
        public Database Get() {
            return _database ?? (_database = new Database());
        }
        protected override void DisposeCore() {
            if (_database != null)
                _database.Dispose();
        }
    }

Disposable extension method:

Disposable.cs

public class Disposable : IDisposable
    {
        private bool isDisposed;

        ~Disposable()
        {
            Dispose(false);
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }
        private void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if(!isDisposed && disposing)
            {
                DisposeCore();
            }

            isDisposed = true;
        }

        protected virtual void DisposeCore()
        {
        }
    }

Now we can define our IRepository and our RepositoryBase

IRepository.cs

public interface IRepository<T> where T : class
{
    void Add(T entity);
    void Delete(T entity);
    void Update(T entity);
    T GetById(long Id);
    IEnumerable<T> All();
    IEnumerable<T> AllReadOnly();
}

RepositoryBase.cs

public abstract class RepositoryBase<T> where T : class
    {
        private Database _database;
        private readonly IDbSet<T> _dbset;
        protected RepositoryBase(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)
        {
            DatabaseFactory = databaseFactory;
            _dbset = Database.Set<T>();
        }

        protected IDatabaseFactory DatabaseFactory
        {
            get; private set;
        }

        protected Database Database
        {
            get { return _database ?? (_database = DatabaseFactory.Get()); }
        }
        public virtual void Add(T entity)
        {
            _dbset.Add(entity);
        }

        public virtual void Delete(T entity)
        {
            _dbset.Remove(entity);
        }

        public virtual void Update(T entity)
        {
            _database.Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Modified;
        }
        public virtual T GetById(long id)
        {
            return _dbset.Find(id);
        }

        public virtual IEnumerable<T> All()
        {
            return _dbset.ToList();
        }
        public virtual IEnumerable<T> AllReadOnly()
        {
            return _dbset.AsNoTracking().ToList();
        }
    }

Now you can create your IPostRepository and PostRepository:

IPostRepository.cs

     public interface IPostRepository : IRepository<Post>
        {
            //Add custom methods here if needed
            Post ByTitle(string title);
        }

PostRepository.cs

    public class PostRepository : RepositoryBase<Post>, IPostRepository
        {
            public PostRepository(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory) : base(databaseFactory)
            {
            }
            public Post ByTitle(string title) {
                return base.Database.Posts.Single(x => x.Title == title);
            }
        }

Lastly, the UoW:

IUnitOfWork.cs

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
    void Commit();
}

UnitOfWork.cs

private readonly IDatabaseFactory _databaseFactory;
private Database _database;

public UnitOfWork(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)
{
    _databaseFactory = databaseFactory;
}

protected Database Database
{
    get { return _database ?? (_database = _databaseFactory.Get()); }
}

public void Commit()
{
    Database.Commit();
}

Using in your controller:

private readonly IPostRepository _postRepository;
private readonly IUnitOfWork_unitOfWork;

        public PostController(IPostRepository postRepository, IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
        {
            _postRepository = postRepository;
            _unitOfWork = unitOfWork;
        }

        public ActionResult Add(Post post) {
            _postRepository.Add(post);
            _unitOfWork.Commit();
        }

You will need to use an IoC container like StructureMap to make this work. You can install structure map via NuGet, or if you are using MVC 3, you can install the StructureMap-MVC NuGet package. (Links Below)

Install-Package StructureMap.MVC4

Install-Package StructureMap.MVC3

Install-Package Structuremap

If you have questions just let me know. Hope it helps.

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What SM Lifecycle did you use for each of these? –  mxmissile Dec 16 '10 at 20:58
3  
You want to use HttpContextScoped. So it would look like: x.For<IUnitOfWork>().HttpContextScoped().Use<UnitOfWork>(); etc –  Paul Dec 16 '10 at 21:55
    
Same lifecycle for IDatabaseFactory? –  mxmissile Dec 16 '10 at 22:08
    
Yes, you want all data access concerns to be HttpContextScoped. Including any I...Repository() –  Paul Dec 16 '10 at 22:27
1  
@Justin It isn't necessary because it's abstract and the ISpecificRepository interfaces inherit from IRepository<T>, and then the SpecificRepository implementations use RepositoryBase<T> to fulfill the contract. –  James M. Mar 9 '12 at 6:43

The only thing I'd do differently is in the implementation, i.e. expose the IPostRepository in the service layer and have an interface field of type IPostService in the controller just as another layer of abstraction but otherwise this is a good example - nice one, Paul.

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1  
I do the same in my projects. It is good abstraction and also keeps the controller actions clean and simple. –  Paul Jan 12 '11 at 1:37
    
Hi Paul, it has been quite awhile and what you showed here has worked really well. But I haven't been doing any unit tests at all :) Just today that I'm thinking about doing unit test, and using the MOQ framework to mock the data, how would I do that? Do I have to re-create the repositories as Mock Repositories, or I can just re-use what I've already have? Thank you very much. –  Saxman Jan 18 '11 at 17:16
    
@Saxman - I would ask a new questoins. How to Unit Test my Repository<T> or something. I can answer it there –  Paul Jan 18 '11 at 22:44
    
:) Yes Paul, how would I test my Repository<T> :) Those add, remove, update methods that we all have to deal with. Even better if we can mock the data, or not have to connect to a real database. Thank you. –  Saxman Jan 19 '11 at 4:08
    
Hi Paul, here is it, my new question :) stackoverflow.com/questions/4738477/… –  Saxman Jan 19 '11 at 17:22

I just love this in-depth article about Entity Framework 4 POCO, Repository and Specification Pattern

http://huyrua.wordpress.com/2010/07/13/entity-framework-4-poco-repository-and-specification-pattern/

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the great link –  A. M. Mar 22 '11 at 23:20
    
+1 for the link, exactly what ive been looking for lately –  Baldy May 4 '11 at 11:04

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