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I have a controller called AuctionsController. In it I have Actions called Index() and AuctionCategoryListing():

//Used for displaying all auctions.
public ActionResult Index()
{
    AuctionRepository auctionRepo = new AuctionRepository();
    var auctions = auctionRepo.FindAllAuctions();
    return View(auctions);
}

//Used for displaying auctions for a single category.
public ActionResult AuctionCategoryListing(string categoryName)
{
    AuctionRepository auctionRepo = new AuctionRepository();
    var auctions = auctionRepo.FindAllAuctions()
                       .Where(c => c.Subcategory.Category.Name == categoryName);
    return View("Index", auctions);
}

As you can tell, they both invoke the same View (is this action called 'to invoke a view'. What is it's proper name?).

@model IEnumerable<Cumavi.Models.Auction>

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Index";
}

<h2>Index</h2>

<p>
    @Html.ActionLink("Create New", "Create")
</p>
<table>
    <tr>
        <th></th>
        <th>
            IDSubcategory
        </th>
        <th>
            IDCity
        </th>
        <th>
            IDPerson
        </th>
        <th>
            Title
        </th>
        <th>
            TextBody
        </th>
        <th>
            ContactNumber
        </th>
        <th>
            AskingPrice
        </th>
        <th>
            AddressDirection
        </th>
        <th>
            LatestUpdateDate
        </th>
        <th>
            VisitCount
        </th>
    </tr>

@foreach (var item in Model) {
    <tr>
        <td>
            @Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit", new { id=item.ID }) |
            @Html.ActionLink("Details", "Details", new { id=item.ID }) |
            @Html.ActionLink("Delete", "Delete", new { id=item.ID })
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.IDSubcategory
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.IDCity
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.IDPerson
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.Title
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.TextBody
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.ContactNumber
        </td>
        <td>
            @String.Format("{0:F}", item.AskingPrice)
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.AddressDirection
        </td>
        <td>
            @String.Format("{0:g}", item.LatestUpdateDate)
        </td>
        <td>
            @item.VisitCount
        </td>
    </tr>
}

</table>

They both inherit from the same Model.

My question is, am I doing things the right appropriate way? Or is this just a hack I managed to scrape together. Help me before I learn a bad habit.

share|improve this question
1  
I gauge answers according to upvotes, whoever is downvoting every answer here please stop. :\ –  delete Dec 14 '10 at 18:53
    
Hear hear, or at least have the courtesy to give a reason, we're all here to learn so at least contribute to the discussion by offering an explanation/opinion. –  RichardW1001 Dec 14 '10 at 19:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd modify this to:

public ActionResult Index(string categoryName)
{

    AuctionRepository auctionRepo = new AuctionRepository();
    var auctions=auctionRepo.FindAllAuctions();

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(categoryName))
    {
        auctions = auctions.Where(c => c.Subcategory.Category.Name == categoryName);
    }

    return View(auctions);
}

Your route might then look like:

    context.MapRoute(
        "auction_defalt",
        "Auction/{categoryName}",
        new { controller="Auction", action = "Index", categoryName = UrlParameter.Optional }

Since the actions are so similar, I don't see a reason to separate them.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate on what '{index}' represents? My URLs are like: Auctions/Clothes, or Auctions/Electronics - etc. I don't really want to break that. –  delete Dec 14 '10 at 18:48
    
{index} was incorrect. I've updated my response. –  David Lively Dec 14 '10 at 18:59
    
I ended up choosing this as the answer because it is the most succinct code and the intent of the code is very straightforward and not convoluted. –  delete Dec 15 '10 at 13:32

Like any framework ASP.NET MVC gives you plenty of opportunities to shoot yourself in the foot. Without forethought the reuse of controller actions, view models, and views can quickly become a maintenance nightmare. Not to mention that without similar consideration your routes will become hard to tie together.

Following the tenets of convention over configuration you could solve your problem by using separate actions but reusing a view partial. To me the index action of the AuctionsController should be responsible for listing all Auctions in the system. I wouldn't call my category action AuctionCategoryListing, but would instead call it simply Category. Through convention this has the nice effect of laying out the routes as:

  • site.com/auctions/ for the index
  • site.com/auctions/category/CATEGORYNAME for the category.

The route is easily understandable by the user and easy for you to understand explicitly what each does. (To this point Omar provides a good suggestion in his answer to let your repository handle pagination, filtering etc.)

As far as what each action should return you have several options. My preference would be to return separate views each containing a reference to a common partial. This gives you flexibility to create different views surrounding the partial but provides reuse for the piece that is common.

Further reading that might be of help:

share|improve this answer
    
Yep MVC encourages separation of concerns but it doesn’t enforce it by any means, so people start doing things that looks and feels good, but in the long term cause a lot of headaches, believe me i know whats its like (painfull). What saved you some hours of design at the beginning will shoot you back in the end, as the question ask for help on develop a bad habit i just wanted to point it out. And don´t get me wrong its just an advice –  JOBG Dec 14 '10 at 19:19
1  
@Omar very much agreed. We use an architecture where are Controller actions are VERY small. –  ahsteele Dec 14 '10 at 20:32

You have to do branching somewhere, so it's probably more of a preference question.

The way I would handle it is to have a single method, and have it take in the category name as the parameter. Since strings are nullable, if one is not specified it will be null. My one action method would probably look something like:

public ActionResult Index(string categoryName)
{
    AuctionRepository auctionRepo = new AuctionRepository();
    var auctions = auctionRepo.FindAllAuctions();

    if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(categoryName) == false)
      auctions = auctions.Where(c => c.Subcategory.Category.Name == categoryName);

    return View(auctions);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I really like your suggestion. I'll definitely try it out and see how it fits. Let's see what other people think. –  delete Dec 14 '10 at 18:51
    
Someone is trolling here, just downvoting every answer. –  delete Dec 14 '10 at 18:54
    
Yeah, I saw it was done to pretty much everyone else to, that's why I deleted my comment. There's always gotta be at least one :) –  Brian Ball Dec 14 '10 at 18:56
    
@Sergio yep. Good times. –  David Lively Dec 14 '10 at 18:59

I would prefer the repo to do things like filtering and pagination for the sake of performance and DRY concept

public ActionResult Index(string categoryName)
    {
        AuctionRepository auctionRepo = new AuctionRepository();

    //Let the Repo Handle things like filtering and pagination, avoiding performance issues

        var auctions = auctionRepo.FindAllAuctions(categoryName); 

        return View(auctions);
    }

DAL should be responsible for this tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
My FindAllAuctions method returns an IQueryable<T>. So whether I filter in the Controller or in the Repository class, it's a matter of preference. I can even use Skip() and Take() on IQueryable<T> to paginate. –  delete Dec 14 '10 at 18:52
    
Ok i agree thats preference, if you doing filtering on multiple fields ill recommend you to take a look at PredicateBuilder to avoid all the if then elseif thing at controller level. –  JOBG Dec 14 '10 at 19:01
    
..or you could just do it in a stored procedure. –  David Lively Dec 14 '10 at 22:14

It's a feature of MVC that the view and controller are independent. You could equally use shared or partial views for the same thing, if anything I'd say it's a good thing because you're writing re-usable code and making use of it.

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