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I'm thinking of whether or not it is possible for atomic variable to load the old value in acquire-release pair. Let's suppose we have atomic variable x, and we store that variable with release semantics and later load it with acquire semantics is it possible in theory to read the old value?

std::atomic<int> x = 0;

void thread_1()
{
   x.store(1, std::memory_order_release);
}
void thread_2()
{
   assert(x.load(std::memory_order_acquire) != 0);
}

if function thread 1 is finished when thread 2 loads the x (so the new value is stored) is it possible for thread 2 to load old value from x? In other words if actual store to x is done before the load is it possible for assert to fire?

As far as I understood from articles in internet it is possible, but I cannot understand why. Memory fence generated by store to x guaranties to empty store buffer, while acquire memory fence in load from x is guaranteed to invalidate cache line, so it has to read up-to-date value.

added

Does it mean that acquire-release by itself doesn't have any enforced ordering? It's only anything that was done before release will happen before release and everything that is done after acquire will happen after it, so acquire-release pair enforces ordering on the other operations (why??). Did I get it right? Does it mean that in the code bellow assert is guaranteed to do not fire

std::atomic<int> x = 0;
std::atomic<int> y = 0;

void thread_1()
{
   y.store(1, std::memory_order_relaxed);
   x.store(1, std::memory_order_release);
}
void thread_2()
{
   x.load(std::memory_order_acquire);
   assert(y.load(std::memory_order_relaxed) != 0);
}

of course again if the thread 1 was already finished the store. If we replace x.load with while (x.load() == 0) this will 100% work, but I don't know what causes this to work.

And what if I replace the code with code bellow

std::atomic<int> x = 0;

void thread_1()
{
   x.exchange(1, std::memory_order_acq_rel);
}
void thread_2()
{
   assert(x.exchange(0, std::memory_order_acq_rel) != 0);
}

Does it change anything?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I want to know whether or not it is guaranteed to do not fire (of course in case if actual store was done before load). –  axl Dec 14 '10 at 19:07
    
yes, your edit had already cleared that up. My comment was written before your edit was displayed. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 14 '10 at 19:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You might consider store/load functions with release/acquire memory order as the following pseudo-code:

template<class T>
struct weak_atomic
{
   void store(T newValue)
   {
      ReleaseBarrier();
      m_value = newValue;
   }

   T load()
   {
      T value = m_value;
      AcquireBarrier();
      return value;      
   }

   volatile T m_value;
}

You said

Memory fence generated by store to x guaranties to empty store buffer

As I understand, the release memory barrier will cause the CPU to flush its store buffer, but it will be done before applying new value to x. So, it seems possible to read old value from x by another CPU.

Anyway, weak atomics is very complex area. Make sure you understand memory barriers before proceeding with lock-free programming.

ADDED

It seems you are still confused with memory barriers. This is a pretty common example of their usage.

volatile int  x;
volatile bool ok;

void thread_1()
{
   x = 100;
   ok = true;
}

void thread_2()
{
   if (ok)
   {
      assert(x == 100);
   }
}

Due to out-of-order execution you may get the following sequence:

thread 1 sets ok to true
thread 2 checks ok is true and reads some garbage from x
thread 1 sets x to 100 but it is too late

Another possible sequence:

thread 2 reads some garbage from x
thread 2 checks for ok value

We may fix that with release and acquire memory barriers.

volatile int  x;
volatile bool ok;

void thread_1()
{
   x = 100;
   ReleaseBarrier();
   ok = true;
}

void thread_2()
{
   if (ok)
   {
      AcquireBarrier();
      assert(x == 100);
   }
}

ReleaseBarrier() guarantees that memory writes can't jump over the barrier. It means that ok is only set to true when x already contains valid value.

AcquireBarrier() guarantees that memory reads can't jump over the barrier. It means that the value of x is only read after checking ok state.

This is how release/acquire pair is intended to be used. We can rewrite this example with my weak_atomic.

volatile int  x;
weak_atomic<bool> ok;

void thread_1()
{
   x = 100;
   ok.store(true);
}

void thread_2()
{
   if (ok.load())
   {
      assert(x == 100);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hm. We can replace pseudocode with the real one. We can put std::atomic_thread_fence(std::memory_order_release) there and make the operation itself "relaxed". Actually you are right, fence is applied before, I didn't think about that, but I don't get how does this make sense. Release barrier is supposed to be there to post the changes, but it actually does nothing. I update my question above. –  axl Dec 15 '10 at 2:38
    
@axl: I've added an example of how release/acquire pair is intended to be used. I hope it helps. –  Stas Dec 15 '10 at 21:59
    
@Stas: Actually I meant something different, probably I failed in explaining that, because once I read my question today I was confused as well :) The classic example of memory barriers is using while loop, which is absent in my example. My question was that: is there guarantee, that load, tagged with memory_order_acquire will immediately see the store, tagged with memory_order_release (like with sequentially-consistent model). –  axl Dec 16 '10 at 15:52
    
It's really difficult to explain what exactly I don't understand :) I read lot of articles and literature about fences and atomics and seems that I've understood everything written there, but something is missing, something I don't get, but it's difficult even to understand what exactly. I'm waiting for a moment when I'll find this missing bit of information, understand the whole picture and say AHA!!! I got it! :) Sometimes in happens. –  axl Dec 16 '10 at 16:15
1  
@axl: Possible, reading that document will help you rdrop.com/users/paulmck/scalability/paper/whymb.2010.06.07c.pdf –  Stas Dec 16 '10 at 19:55

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