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Solution found thanks to everyone's answers. Check bottom of this post.

I am using MVC and the problem concerns my model. With my code I am creating a board which in turn creates tiles. Every tile on the board gets an X and a Y value. After this I want to prevent access to the setter to prevent myself from accidentally changing the value ever again.

I was thinking of using a constant instead of a variable, but it seems I have to define the value at the time of creation. In other words: const myConst:uint; myConst = 2; // does not work

Right now I have a work-around which I am not happy with. Surely there's a cleaner way. You can see my work-around below.

package myboardgame
{
 internal class Tile
 {
  private var _x:uint;
  private var _y:uint;

  private var _xLock:Boolean; // Makes sure that the X and Y values of a tile can only be set once to prevent errors
  private var _yLock:Boolean; //  " " 

  internal function set x(x:uint):void
  { if(!_xLock) {_x = x; _xLock = true;} else { throw new Error("Trying to change the one-time write access X tile value")}}
  internal function get x():uint
  { return _x; }
 }
}

Edit. The solution I went with:

package myboardgame
{
    internal class Tile
{
    private var _x:uint;
    private var _y:uint;

    public function Tile(x:uint, y:uint):void
    {
        _x = x;
        _y = y;
    }
    internal function get x():uint
    { return _x; }

    internal function get y():uint
    { return _y; }
}
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to set the value at the creation time you must define an explicit constructor for your class (always suggested even when not needed).

The constructor you define must basically have one parameter by means of which you can provide a value to the inner attribute. This is done only once at the instance initialization.

public class Tile {

   //these are the attributes: your instance status
   private var x:int;
   private var y:int;

   //this is the class constructor
  public function Tile(_x:int, _y:int){
      //here goes the initialization of your attributes and other stuff you may need
      x = _x;
      y = _y;
   }

   //then the other methods... 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Agree. But there must be two params. He also has an y. –  Alin Purcaru Dec 14 '10 at 19:22
    
I'm having a hard time understand the text because I am relatively new to programming. I would be really grateful if you could write a short code example. –  Glacius Dec 14 '10 at 19:25
    
It works. Thank you for taking the time to write out the example. It helped me a lot. At first I didn't think it would work because I need to use a getter method to retrieve the value, but it turns out that you can use a getter without having a setter. –  Glacius Dec 14 '10 at 19:44

Assuming your variables are NEVER going to be as big as uint.MAX_VALUE:

package{
  public class MyClass{
    private var _x:uint = uint.MAX_VALUE;
    public function set x(x:uint){
      if (x != MAX_VALUE)
        //error
      _x = x;
    } 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. It looks much cleaner than my work-around. I think I will use this if no better answer comes along. One question though: I heard that it's bad to declare a value before running a function, is there any truth to that? –  Glacius Dec 14 '10 at 19:27
    
I've been making games in flash for around 3 years now, made over 20 of them and it was never an issue for me. But there might be some mystical hidden reasons behind that, maybe some problems with managing. But as far as I can tell even official Flex uses preset fields :). Alernatively use Number, set to NaN and check isNaN() –  Maurycy Zarzycki Dec 14 '10 at 20:41
    
I see. I'm trying to code by the rules as much as possible and allow myself to be more lenient once I know exactly why it's common practice to do something a certain way. I guess this is one thing I can be a little more lenient about. –  Glacius Dec 14 '10 at 23:22
    
The only reasons I can see for not declaring variables right in the class is if you want that variable to be unset during creation/later, and if you explicitly declare it in the constructor anyway. –  Maurycy Zarzycki Dec 15 '10 at 7:47

I would use parameters in a constructor like this:

var Tile : Tile = new Tile(3,6);

Or If you need a setter:

package
{
  public class Tile
  {
    private var _x : uint;
    private var _isSetX : Boolean;
    private var _y : uint;
    private var _isSetY : Boolean;

    public function set x(value : uint)
    {
      if (_isSetX)
        return;
      
      _x = value;

    }

   .......


  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is indeed what I am using now. –  Glacius Dec 14 '10 at 19:46

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