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ok, heres my code. I'm trying to pass an array of pointers to a structure to a function. I need to dynamically allocate each structure and put a pointer to that structure in the array. When I malloc the second time thru it gets a heap error. HELP

#define MAXSTRUCTS 50
#define MAXBUFF 100


typedef struct {  
 char fullName[41];  
 char address[41];  
 char cityState[41];  
 char zipcode[11];  
} Persons;  

int readData(Persons *structPtrs[]);

int main(void) {

     int totalStructs;  
     Persons *structPtrs[MAXSTRUCTS];  
     totalStructs = 0;  
     structPtrs[0] = NULL;  
     totalStructs = readData(structPtrs);  
}

int readData(Persons *strptr[]) {

    int tStructs = 0;  
    int recs;  
    char inRecord[MAXBUFF];  
    Persons *tmpPtr;  
    tStructs = 0;  
    for (recs=0; recs < MAXSTRUCTS; recs++) {  
        if (gets(inRecord) != NULL) {  
           strptr[recs] = (Persons *)malloc( sizeof(Persons));  
           tmpPtr = strptr[recs];  
           strncpy(tmpPtr->fullName,inRecord,MAXBUFF);  
           gets(inRecord);  
           strncpy(tmpPtr->address,inRecord,MAXBUFF);  
           gets(inRecord);  
           strncpy(tmpPtr->cityState,inRecord,MAXBUFF);  
           gets(inRecord);  
           strncpy(tmpPtr->zipcode,inRecord,MAXBUFF);  
           strptr[recs] = tmpPtr;  
           tStructs++;  
        }  
        else {  
             if ( recs = 0 ) {  
                exit (0);  
             }  
             recs=MAXSTRUCTS;  
        }  
    }  
    return(tStructs);  
}  
share|improve this question
    
What heap error? What input do you give it? –  nmichaels Dec 14 '10 at 19:16
    
gets may overflow –  reinierpost Dec 14 '10 at 19:20
4  
Never use gets. Never. –  Adam Rosenfield Dec 14 '10 at 19:21
    
heap overflow. it's not allocating a new structure. It trys to alloc over the old structure. I can't free it because I need that location –  George D Dec 14 '10 at 19:23
    
gets or fgets is not the problem, both work fine. I've tried it with both and both are legal. using fgets(inRecords,MAXBUFF,stdin); does not effect what I'm trying to do. –  George D Dec 14 '10 at 19:24
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2 Answers 2

You are doing everything right in regard of passing an array of pointers and allocating memory. What leading to a heap corruption is incorrect usage of strncpy function. The arrays where you are trying to copy data to are slightly smaller than MAXBUFF in all cases. To fix this, you have to specify the size of destination array instead of MAXBUFF. For example, instead of:

strncpy(tmpPtr->fullName,inRecord,MAXBUFF); 

... do (assuming that buffer is already filled with \0 symbols):

strncpy(tmpPtr->fullName,inRecord, sizeof(tmpPtr->fullName) - 1); 

Also, using gets function is not recommended as well as it could easily lead to buffer overruns. Try using fgets instead.

Here is your modified example that works:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAXSTRUCTS 2
#define MAXBUFF 100

typedef struct {
  char fullName[41];
  char address[41];
  char cityState[41];
  char zipcode[11];
} Persons;

int readData(Persons *structPtrs[]);

int main ()
{
  int totalStructs;
  int recs;
  Persons *structPtrs[MAXSTRUCTS];
  totalStructs = 0;
  structPtrs[0] = NULL;
  totalStructs = readData(structPtrs);
  for(recs = 0; recs < totalStructs; ++recs) {
    printf ("Record #%d - %s\n", recs + 1, structPtrs[recs]->fullName);
  }
  return 0;
}

int readData(Persons *strptr[])
{
  int tStructs = 0;
  int recs;
  char inRecord[MAXBUFF];
  Persons *tmpPtr;
  tStructs = 0;
  for (recs=0; recs < MAXSTRUCTS; ++recs) {
    memset (inRecord, 0, sizeof(inRecord));
    if (fgets(inRecord, sizeof (inRecord) - 1, stdin))
      {
      strptr[recs] = (Persons *)malloc(sizeof(Persons));
      tmpPtr = strptr[recs];
      memset (tmpPtr, 0, sizeof(Persons));
      strncpy(tmpPtr->fullName,inRecord,sizeof(tmpPtr->fullName) - 1);
      fgets(inRecord, sizeof (inRecord) - 1, stdin);
      strncpy(tmpPtr->address,inRecord,sizeof(tmpPtr->address) - 1);
      fgets(inRecord, sizeof (inRecord) - 1, stdin);
      strncpy(tmpPtr->cityState,inRecord, sizeof(tmpPtr->cityState) - 1);
      fgets(inRecord, sizeof (inRecord) - 1, stdin);
      strncpy(tmpPtr->zipcode,inRecord, sizeof (tmpPtr->zipcode) - 1);
      strptr[recs] = tmpPtr;
      tStructs++;
    } else {
      if ( recs = 0 ) {
    exit (0);
      }
      recs=MAXSTRUCTS;
    }
  }
  return(tStructs);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Vlad, I'll give that a try. I can see where strncpy can cause a problem, but I would think it would fail on the first time. unfortunately can't use memset, forced to use malloc. –  George D Dec 14 '10 at 19:35
    
@George: memset and malloc are totally different things. memset fills already allocated memory with the constant byte specified as a second argument. You may not use it, but then you will have to take care of putting '\0' where it is needed manually. –  user405725 Dec 14 '10 at 19:38
    
Great Vlad, that worked, thanks so much. –  George D Dec 14 '10 at 19:38
add comment

 int readDataToRecord( Persons *eachEntry[] ) {

int numEntries = 0 ;

Persons *tempPtr ;

for( int i=0 ; i < NUM_OF_RECORDS; ++i ) {

    eachEntry[i] = ( Record * ) malloc( sizeof( Record ) ) ;
    memset( eachEntry[i], 0, sizeof( Record ) ) ;

    tempPtr = eachEntry[i] ;

    fgets( tempPtr->firstName,  sizeof( tempPtr->firstName ), stdin ) ;
    fgets( tempPtr->secondName, sizeof( tempPtr->secondName), stdin ) ;

    eachEntry[i] = tempPtr ;

    ++numEntries ;
}

return numEntries ;

}

This would also efficiently do the job. Once you have new record, you would any how have the memory allocated for each of its member. So you can directly fgets to that variable.

@Vlad : Please let me know if I am wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is reasonable. –  user405725 Dec 15 '10 at 14:00
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