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I have a python program that is essentailly made up of turtle graphics, and it is basically asking the user how many squares to draw, and then after each square, it adds 1 to a counter using:

counter=1
<drawing code here>
counter +=1

And then after that I wanted to do a check to see if the number of squares is equal to the amount that the user typed in, and if it is, then I wanted to go to the bottom of the script where I would make it say something like done!!. but I dont know how to make it go to a certain part of the script as the goto command that I'm used to in batch isn't supported in python (i know, goto= spaghetti code)

I found an easy workaround is just to download a module that someone made that lets you import the goto command into python and use it just as you would in batch but I would like a native python solution if any!

my current code is:

from turtle import *
import time
counter=1
color("red", "blue")
down()

user=int(raw_input('how many balls do you want?'))
counter +=1
if user===counter:

# solution goes here!

else:

for step in range(24):
        right(105)
        forward(100)
        right(105)
        forward(100)
        right(105)
        forward(100)
        right(105)
        forward(100)

up()
goto(120,0)
down()


counter +=1
if user==counter:

#solution goes here!

else:

for step in range(24):
        right(105)
        forward(100)
        right(105)
        forward(100)
        right(105)
        forward(100)
        right(105)
        forward(100)

up()
goto(0,-50)
write("Done!")

time.sleep(5) 

If you have an answer or alternative to this problem it would be greatly appreciated!

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5  
Is there a reason you're not using functions? –  Falmarri Dec 14 '10 at 19:39
    
goto(120,0) seems to reposition you at (x,y). It looks like a function and is not the goto that you find in some programming language which takes control to specified code directly. At least from the first look, this is what it seems. –  pyfunc Dec 14 '10 at 19:41
2  
Uh.... the goto you get from the turtle module has absolutely nothing to do with jumping to somewhere else in the script... it sets the position of the turtle. Anyway, the way you make this work is to structure your code. Pretend you never heard of "goto", and learn how real control structures work, from the beginning. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 14 '10 at 19:43
    
@pyfunc: He means a different kind of "goto", the kind that structured programming is supposed to make obsolete. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 14 '10 at 19:43
4  
You are doing it wrong(tm). You need to learn how to structure code using functions, loops, etc. Programmers learning yet another language may skip that language's tutorial (until they do get into trouble, of course), but if your prior experience is merely batch scripting, there's no need to make things a hundred times more difficult by not following a well-written tutorial/book. I recommend How to Think like a computer scientist. –  delnan Dec 14 '10 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Does this help?

import turtle   # don't pollute the namespace
import time

def getInt(msg):
    return int(raw_input(msg))

def drawBall():
    turtle.down()
    for i in range(96):
        turtle.right(105)
        turtle.forward(100)
    turtle.up()

def moveOver():
    turtle.goto(120,0)

def Done():
    turtle.goto(0,-50)
    turtle.write('Done!')
    time.sleep(5)

def main(): 
    turtle.color('red','blue')
    for i in range(getInt('How many balls do you want?')):
        drawBall()
        moveOver()
    Done()

if __name__=="__main__":
    main()

Don't think in terms of a single long list of instructions. Think instead about breaking your problem apart into smaller actions, such as "drawing a ball", and write each of those actions as a procedure; then think about how to join those procedures together to accomplish your goal. Writing the same code repeatedly is a sign that you are doing it wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
ok this code has no errors, but it also wont open! it flashes a console up on the screen for like .1 seconds and then closes with no errors... any ideas? –  daniel11 Dec 14 '10 at 23:24
    
@Daniel11: Two ways to run it: first, cut and paste into an interactive session; second, save as (for example) myturtle.py then run from the command-line 'python -i myturtle.py' (the -i tells the interpreter to remain in interactive mode when the script ends). –  Hugh Bothwell Dec 14 '10 at 23:31
    
wait, the program you posted above just defines variables, are you saying that i have to do what you posted, then put in the instructions such as right(90) or forward(110)? because the script you posted doesnt actually display anything... –  daniel11 Dec 14 '10 at 23:32
    
what do you mean by that? –  daniel11 Dec 14 '10 at 23:32
    
@Daniel11: um... how are you running python right now? Like, if you wanted to run 'print("Hello, world")', how would you do so? –  Hugh Bothwell Dec 14 '10 at 23:38

Don't check the number of squares and then go to the end, just loop the appropriate number of times instead, drawing a square each time.

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some hints:

>>> def square():
    print "+--+"
    print "|  |"
    print "|  |"
    print "+--+"
    print


>>> range(5)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> for x in range(5):
    print x
    square()


0
+--+
|  |
|  |
+--+

1
+--+
|  |

[snip]

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Break down your code into functions, then use return whenever you want to skip the remaining code of a function.

UPDATE: I do not necessarily condone multiple exit points for a function, as a commenter obviously assumed; this answer is in the context of the question. My opinion on the matter of multiple-exits co-incides with that of Tim Peters:

Well, single-exit is best because it always makes instrumentation easier and often makes reasoning easier (up until the alternative introduces so many goofy Boolean flags that keeping track of those is worse than the disease).

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1  
While not so bad as goto, this is often bad programming practice - it is much easier to debug a function when it always exits in one place. –  Hugh Bothwell Dec 15 '10 at 0:38
    
@Hugh: the question was clear: Python alternative to the goto command, so in this context I consider my answer useful; we obviously disagree on the context. –  tzot Dec 15 '10 at 8:36
    
@TZ?: to my embarrassment, I found myself using this very pattern shortly after writing my comment. Definitely, it has its place and can make a function more readable when used sparingly - but as the saying goes, you need to know the rules to break them intelligently ;-) –  Hugh Bothwell Dec 15 '10 at 22:41

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