Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, this might be a weird thing to try to do, but I'm curious if it's possible:

Say I have an associative array like this:

myarray[50] = 'test1'  
myarray[100] = 'test2'

I can access 'test1' by it's key, of course:

myarray[50]; // returns 'test1'

But is there a way where if I have an index key of '60', that I can look in the array and if key 60 isn't there, get the value of the next "closest" key, '50'?

The use-case for this is that I am trying to set up cue-points for a video, and if the user seeks and misses a cue point, I want to display the information from the last cue point the user seeked beyond.

I think I can check for the existence of the key with the 'in' operator. But if it's not found, how can I get the "previous" or "next smallest" array key that DOES exist?

I assume the only way to do this is to iterate through the array, saving the "last" index value until the exit condition of "index > myKey" is found. The thing is, if it's a long video with lots of queue points and the user seeks frequently, iterating through the entire array of cue points each time might be slow. Is there a better, faster way to do this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'd have to write your own function:

function getClosestTo(val, array) {
    if (array[val] !== undefined) {
        return val;
    } else {
        var upper = val;
        var upperMatched = false;
        var lower = val;
        var lowerMatched = false;

        while(upper < this.length) {
            if (array[++upper] !== undefined) {
                upperMatched = true;
                break;
            };
        };

        while(lower > -1) {
            if (array[--lower] !== undefined) {
                lowerMatched = true;
                break;
            };
        };

        if (upperMatched && lowerMatched) {
            return upper - val < val - lower ? upper : lower;
        } else if (upperMatched) {
            return upper;
        } else if (lowerMatched) {
            return lower;
        };
    };

    return -1;
};

You could also add this as a method of the Array prototype, to make (what I think) is more readable:

Array.prototype.getClosestTo = function (val) {
    if (this[val] !== undefined) {
        return val;
    } else {
        var upper = val;
        var upperMatched = false;
        var lower = val;
        var lowerMatched = false;

        while(upper < this.length) {
            if (this[++upper] !== undefined) {
                upperMatched = true;
                break;
            };
        };

        while(lower > -1) {
            if (this[--upper] !== undefined) {
                lowerMatched = true;
                break;
            };
        };

        if (upperMatched && lowerMatched) {
            return upper - val < val - lower ? upper : lower;
        } else if (upperMatched) {
            return upper;
        } else if (lowerMatched) {
            return lower;
        };
    };

    return -1;
};

// Usage: 
// var closestKey = theArray.getClosestTo(50);
share|improve this answer
    
Just what I suspected, but thanks for the tips! I would not have thought of putting that in the Array prototype, but it would be slick that way! –  thaddeusmt Dec 22 '10 at 22:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.