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I was wondering if there is a way having this

var string = "foo::bar"

To get the last part of the string: "bar" using just regex.

I was trying to do look-aheads but couldn't master them enough to do this.

--

UPDATE

Perhaps some examples will make the question clearer.

var st1 = "foo::bar::0"
match should be 0

var st2 = "foo::bar::0-3aab"
match should be 0-3aab

var st3 = "foo"
no match should be found
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as a separator, I want to have everything after the last '::' section, could be that after the '::' I have any other type of symbol, number, etc. –  jpabluz Dec 14 '10 at 20:34
    
Can the last token contain :? If so, can it be foo:::bar, and how will you handle it? –  Kobi Dec 14 '10 at 21:08
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use a negative lookahead:

/::(?!.*::)(.*)$/

The result will then be in the capture.

Another approach:

/^.*::(.*)$/

This should work because the .* matches greedily, so the :: will match the last occurence of that string.

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And if you have trailing whitespace, or may or may not have trailing whitespace, try `"\\w+\\s*$" instead. –  Adam Norberg Dec 14 '10 at 20:33
    
This will not work for my examples, at it will match "bar::0" in the first example. –  jpabluz Dec 14 '10 at 20:50
    
This won't work—* is greedy, and so will, for instance, match bar::0-3aab in foo::bar::0-3aab. –  Antal S-Z Dec 14 '10 at 20:50
    
@Antal S-Z: You're right that it wouldn't work for the updated examples, but the reason you gave for why it wouldn't work is not right. It has nothing to do with the greediness. Using a lazy match .*? would also fail. I've updated my answer wiith a hopefully working version. –  Mark Byers Dec 14 '10 at 20:55
    
@Mark: Touché. And a very nice updated solution. –  Antal S-Z Dec 14 '10 at 21:05
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Simply,

/::(.+)$/

You can't use lookaheads unless you know exactly how long a string you're trying to match. Fortunately, this isn't an issue, because you're only looking at the end of the string $.

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This will not work for my examples, at it will match "bar::0" in the first example. –  jpabluz Dec 14 '10 at 20:49
    
This won't work—+ is greedy, and so will, for instance, match bar::0-3aab in foo::bar::0-3aab. –  Antal S-Z Dec 14 '10 at 20:50
    
Sorry, it still won't work, but not for the reason I said. –  Antal S-Z Dec 14 '10 at 21:05
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I wouldn't use regular expressions for this (although you certainly can); I'd split the string on ::, since that's conceptually what you want to do.

function lastToken(str) {
  var xs = str.split('::');
  return xs.length > 1 ? xs.pop() : null;
}

If you really want just a regular expression, you can use /::((?:[^:]|:(?!:))*)$/. First, it matches a literal ::. Then, we use parentheses to put the desired thing in capturing group 1. The desired thing is one or more copies of a (?:...)-bracketed string; this bracketing groups without capturing. We then look for either [^:], a non-colon character, or :(?!:), a colon followed by a non-colon. The (?!...) is a negative lookahead, which matches only if the next token doesn't match the contained pattern. Since JavaScript doesn't support negative lookbehinds, I can't see a good way to avoid capturing the :: as well, but you can wrap this in a function:

function lastTokenRegex(str) {
  var m = str.match(/::((?:[^:]|:(?!:))*)$/);
  return m && m[1];
}
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var string2 = string.replace(/.*::/, "");

though perhaps string isn't the best choice of name for your string?

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haha yes, the name was just for illustrating purposes. =) –  jpabluz Dec 14 '10 at 20:40
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