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I'm looking at all different sorts. Note that this is not homework (I'm in the midst of finals) I'm just looking to be prepared if that sort of thing would pop up. I was unable to find a reliable method of doing a quicksort iteratively. Is it possible and, if so, how?

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5  
Any recursive algorithm can be implemented as a loop if you manage a stack yourself instead of using the call stack. Is that sufficient for what you're after? –  Anon. Dec 14 '10 at 20:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>

#define MAXELT          100
#define INFINITY        32760         // numbers in list should not exceed
                                      // this. change the value to suit your
                                      // needs
#define SMALLSIZE       10            // not less than 3
#define STACKSIZE       100           // should be ceiling(lg(MAXSIZE)+1)

int list[MAXELT+1];                   // one extra, to hold INFINITY

struct {                              // stack element.
        int a,b;
} stack[STACKSIZE];

int top=-1;                           // initialise stack

int main()                           // overhead!
{
    int i=-1,j,n;
    char t[10];
    void quicksort(int);

    do {
        if (i!=-1)
            list[i++]=n;
        else
            i++;
        printf("Enter the numbers <End by #>: ");
        fflush(stdin);
        scanf("%[^\n]",t);
        if (sscanf(t,"%d",&n)<1)
        break;
    } while (1);

    quicksort(i-1);

    printf("\nThe list obtained is ");
    for (j=0;j<i;j++)
        printf("\n %d",list[j]);

    printf("\n\nProgram over.");
    getch();
    return 0;       // successful termination.
}

void interchange(int *x,int *y)        // swap
{
    int temp;

    temp=*x;
    *x=*y;
    *y=temp;
}

void split(int first,int last,int *splitpoint)
{
    int x,i,j,s,g;

    // here, atleast three elements are needed
    if (list[first]<list[(first+last)/2]) {  // find median
        s=first;
        g=(first+last)/2;
    }
    else {
        g=first;
        s=(first+last)/2;
    }
    if (list[last]<=list[s]) 
        x=s;
    else if (list[last]<=list[g])
        x=last;
    else
        x=g;
    interchange(&list[x],&list[first]);      // swap the split-point element
                                             // with the first
    x=list[first];
    i=first+1;                               // initialise
    j=last+1;
    while (i<j) {
        do {                                 // find j 
            j--;
        } while (list[j]>x);
        do {
            i++;                             // find i
        } while (list[i]<x);
        interchange(&list[i],&list[j]);      // swap
    }
    interchange(&list[i],&list[j]);          // undo the extra swap
    interchange(&list[first],&list[j]);      // bring the split-point 
                                             // element to the first
    *splitpoint=j;
}

void push(int a,int b)                        // push
{
    top++;
    stack[top].a=a;
    stack[top].b=b;
}

void pop(int *a,int *b)                       // pop
{
    *a=stack[top].a;
    *b=stack[top].b;
    top--;
}

void insertion_sort(int first,int last)
{
    int i,j,c;

    for (i=first;i<=last;i++) {
        j=list[i];
        c=i;
        while ((list[c-1]>j)&&(c>first)) {
            list[c]=list[c-1];
            c--;
        }
        list[c]=j;
    }
}

void quicksort(int n)
{
    int first,last,splitpoint;

    push(0,n);
    while (top!=-1) {
        pop(&first,&last);
        for (;;) {
            if (last-first>SMALLSIZE) {
                // find the larger sub-list
                split(first,last,&splitpoint);
                // push the smaller list
                if (last-splitpoint<splitpoint-first) {
                    push(first,splitpoint-1);
                    first=splitpoint+1;
                }
                else {
                    push(splitpoint+1,last);
                    last=splitpoint-1;
                }
            }
            else {  // sort the smaller sub-lists
                    // through insertion sort
                insertion_sort(first,last);
                break;
            }
        }
    }                        // iterate for larger list
}

// End of code.

taken from here

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I'll try to give a more general answer in addition to the actual implementations given in the other posts.

Is it possible and, if so, how?

Let us first of all take a look at what can be meant by making a recursive algorithm iterative.

For example, we want to have some function sum(n) that sums up the numbers from 0 to n.

Surely, this is

sum(n) = 
  if n = 0
    then return 0
    else return n + sum(n - 1)

As we try to compute something like sum(100000), we'll soon see this recursive algorithm has it's limits - a stack overflow will occur.

So, as a solution, we use an iterative algorithm to solve the same problem.

sum(n) =
   s <- 0
   for i in 0..n do
     s <- s + i
   return s

However, it's important to note that this implementation is an entirely different algorithm than the recursive sum above. We didn't in some way modify the original one to obtain the iterative version, we basically just found a non-recursive algorithm - with different and arguably better performance characteristics - that solves the same problem.

This is the first aspect of making an algorithm iterative: Finding a different, iterative algorithm that solves the same problem.

In some cases, there simply might not be such an iterative version.

The second one however is applicable to every recursive algorithm. You can turn any recursion into iteration by explicitly introducing the stack the recursion uses implicitly. Now this algorithm will have the exact same characteristics as the original one - and the stack will grow with O(n) like in the recursive version. It won't that easily overflow since it uses conventional memory instead of the call stack, and its iterative, but it's still the same algorithm.

As to quick sort: There is no different formulation what works without storing the data needed for recursion. But of course you can use an explicit stack for them like Ehsan showed. Thus you can - as always - produce an iterative version.

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+1 For a much more useful answer compared to the accepted. The important thing to note here is that the complexity of the iterative version of the recursive algorithm will be the same. Thus the only benefit is that we can avoid the stack overflow by using the heap and virtual memory. –  faif Jul 31 '11 at 20:11
 I was unable to find a reliable method of doing a quicksort iteratively

Have you tried google ?

It is just common quicksort, when recursion is realized with array.

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This is my effort. Tell me if there is any improvement possible.

This code is done from the book "Data Structures, Seymour Lipschutz(Page-173), Mc GrawHill, Schaum's Outline Series."

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <math.h>

#define SIZE 12

struct StackItem
{
    int StartIndex;
    int EndIndex;
};
struct StackItem myStack[SIZE * SIZE];
int stackPointer = 0;

int myArray[SIZE] = {44,33,11,55,77,90,40,60,99,22,88,66};

void Push(struct StackItem item)
{
    myStack[stackPointer] = item;
    stackPointer++;
}

struct StackItem Pop()
{
    stackPointer--;
    return myStack[stackPointer];
}

int StackHasItem()
{
    if(stackPointer>0)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return 0;
    }
}

void ShowStack()
{
    int i =0;

    printf("\n");

    for(i=0; i<stackPointer ; i++)
    {
        printf("(%d, %d), ", myStack[i].StartIndex, myStack[i].EndIndex);
    }

    printf("\n");
}

void ShowArray()
{
    int i=0;

    printf("\n");

    for(i=0 ; i<SIZE ; i++)
    {
        printf("%d, ", myArray[i]);
    }

    printf("\n");
}

void Swap(int * a, int *b)
{
    int temp = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = temp;
}

int Scan(int *startIndex, int *endIndex)
{
    int partition = 0;
    int i = 0;

    if(*startIndex > *endIndex)
    {
        for(i=*startIndex ; i>=*endIndex ; i--)
        {
            //printf("%d->", myArray[i]);
            if(myArray[i]<myArray[*endIndex])
            {
                //printf("\nSwapping %d, %d", myArray[i], myArray[*endIndex]);
                Swap(&myArray[i], &myArray[*endIndex]);
                *startIndex = *endIndex;
                *endIndex = i;
                partition = i;
                break;
            }
            if(i==*endIndex)
            {
                *startIndex = *endIndex;
                *endIndex = i;
                partition = i;
            }
        }
    }
    else if(*startIndex < *endIndex)
    {
        for(i=*startIndex ; i<=*endIndex ; i++)
        {
            //printf("%d->", myArray[i]);
            if(myArray[i]>myArray[*endIndex])
            {
                //printf("\nSwapping %d, %d", myArray[i], myArray[*endIndex]);
                Swap(&myArray[i], &myArray[*endIndex]);
                *startIndex = *endIndex;
                *endIndex = i;
                partition = i;
                break;
            }
            if(i==*endIndex)
            {
                *startIndex = *endIndex;
                *endIndex = i;
                partition = i;
            }
        }
    }

    return partition;
}

int GetFinalPosition(struct StackItem item1)
{
    struct StackItem item = {0};
    int StartIndex = item1.StartIndex ;
    int EndIndex = item1.EndIndex;
    int PivotIndex = -99;

    while(StartIndex != EndIndex)
    {
        PivotIndex = Scan(&EndIndex, &StartIndex);

        printf("\n");
    }

    return PivotIndex;
}

void QuickSort()
{
    int median = 0; 
    struct StackItem item;  
    struct StackItem item1={0};
    struct StackItem item2={0};

    item.StartIndex = 0;
    item.EndIndex = SIZE-1;

    Push(item);

    while(StackHasItem())
    {
        item = Pop();

        median = GetFinalPosition(item);

        if(median>=0 && median<=(SIZE-1))
        {
            if(item.StartIndex<=(median-1))
            {
                item1.StartIndex = item.StartIndex;
                item1.EndIndex = median-1;
                Push(item1);
            }       
            if(median+1<=(item.EndIndex))
            {
                item2.StartIndex = median+1;
                item2.EndIndex = item.EndIndex;
                Push(item2);
            }
        }

        ShowStack();
    }
}

main()
{
    ShowArray();
    QuickSort();
    ShowArray();
}
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