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This is how I am trying to get the current working directory:

    char* ch;
    if( (ch = _getcwd( NULL, 0 )) == NULL )
    {
        cout << "Could not get working directory!" << endl;
    }
    // skonvertujme char* na string, s tym sa nizsie bude lahsie pracovat
    stringstream ss;
    string workingDirectory;
    ss << ch;
    ss >> workingDirectory;

    cout << workingDirectory << endl;
    cin.get();
    cin.get();

Which prints out:

C:\Users\Richard\Documents\Visual

Instead of the actual working directory:

C:\Users\Richard\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\Client\Debug

It seems like ti cuts everything after a space.

How can I get the working directory correctly even if there are spaces in the path?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The >> operator stops at the first space. Instead of the stringstream manipulation try

string workingDirectory(ch);
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Just replace this:

stringstream ss;
string workingDirectory;
ss << ch;
ss >> workingDirectory;

with this:

string workingDirectory(ch);
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Use getline(ss, workingDirectory)

The reason that happens is that the << operator in stringstream stops reading when it encounters whitespace.

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1  
Why use the string stream at all? – Loki Astari Dec 14 '10 at 21:03
    
Yes, you're right. – Francisco P. Dec 14 '10 at 21:21

If you really want to use your solution - which is overkill - use the noskipws io-manipulator like so:

ss >> noskipws >> workingDirectory;
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